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1 student remains in hospital after Weld County school bus crash

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 7:34pm

GREELEY — Officials say 27 out of the 28 people hospitalized following a Colorado school bus crash last week have been released from hospitals.

The Greeley Tribune reports one student remains at an Aurora hospital after a flatbed truck crashed into the Greeley-Evans School District bus near the small town of Hudson, northeast of Denver.

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Authorities say the driver of the truck fell asleep at the wheel. The bus had 35 people on board, including 29 students from Greeley Central and North Ridge high schools returning from a field trip.

The students on the bus were in a credit recovery program. District spokeswoman Theresa Myers says classes for the program will continue as normal, but teachers will work one-on-one with students who are unable to attend because of the crash.

Information from: The Tribune of Greeley, Co, http://greeleytribune.com

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Denver Mayor Michael Hancock lays out plan to reduce city’s carbon emissions 80 percent by 2050

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 7:13pm

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock on Tuesday unveiled the city’s ambitious 80×50 Climate Action Plan, which aims to achieve an 80 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from 2005 levels by the year 2050.

Included in the program is the goal to meet 100 percent of Denver’s electricity needs for municipal facilities with renewable sources such as wind and solar by 2025, while also meeting the entire city’s electrical demands with renewable sources by 2030.

The 80×50 Climate Action Plan makes Denver the 73rd city in the United States to commit to 100 percent clean energy and joins nine other Colorado communities that have also adopted the same energy goal.

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“Climate change threatens our people directly, putting our health, environment and economy – our very way of life – at risk,” said Hancock, who announced Denver’s commitment to 100 percent clean energy during his State of the City address Monday.

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Colorado Springs woman fatally shot — allegedly by her estranged husband — had protection order against him

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 7:07pm

A woman fatally shot in Colorado Springs on Friday had filed a restraining order against her estranged husband, who is the suspect in her murder.

Michelle Peters, 41, was identified Tuesday as the victim. Her husband, Mark Peters, 46, faces a first-degree murder charge in her death.

Mark Peters was arrested late Friday as a suspect in the case. He is also suspected of intimidation, stalking, domestic violence; and contempt of court-violation of retraining order, in the case, according to Colorado Bureau of Investigation records.

Colorado Springs PoliceMark Christopher Peters

On May 1, Mark Peters filed for a dissolution of marriage from Michelle Peters in El Paso County Court. Two days later, she filed for a protection order based on domestic abuse, according to court records. A permanent protection order was granted May 30.

In the dissolution of the couple’s marriage, a hearing was held on Friday, according to court records.

Police found Michelle’s body at about 6 p.m. Friday inside a home in the 3400 block of Galleria Terrace. An investigation is ongoing, police said.

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Also on Friday, El Paso County Sheriff’s Office SWAT members, working with the Colorado Springs police, arrested Peters, who was wanted on two counts of violation of a protection order and on a warrant for computer crimes/domestic violence from the Teller County Sheriff’s Office, according to a news release. Colorado Springs detectives obtained an arrest warrant for first-degree murder and served Peters on Saturday at the El Paso County Criminal Justice Center.

A second-degree attempted murder charge against Mark Peters was dropped by prosecutors in El Paso County in 2010. In that case, he was guilty of misdemeanor assault and menacing. He spent 32 days in jail and was sentenced to two years probation, according to CBI records.

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Federal push to open Colorado recreational oasis at Rocky Flats hits plutonium hitch

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 6:55pm

The government’s long-planned gift of a recreational oasis for metro Denver residents at the former Rocky Flats nuclear bomb factory turned wildlife refuge hit a hefty plutonium hitch Tuesday in federal court as project opponents blitzed officials with evidence of potentially deadly risks.

U.S. District Court Judge Philip Brimmer, actively engaged throughout a full day, said he’s weighing it all. Brimmer is expected to rule soon on opponents’ request that he block a scheduled Sept. 15 opening — until U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials conduct a fresh environmental review.

A population-growth and development boom along Colorado’s heavily urbanized Front Range and widening interest in outdoor recreation have propelled the federal push to open this 5,237-acre refuge, around a 1,300-acre contaminated Department of Energy-run core area, for hiking, horse riding and biking.

The refuge has emerged over the past decade as a key part of interconnected open space along a Rocky Mountain Greenway Trail, which includes two other federal wildlife refuges. Refuge manager Dave Lucas testified on plans to install trail signs and eventually build a visitors center at the refuge, where elk, antelope, bobcats and scores of other species are thriving. Department of Justice attorney Jessica Held emphasized that the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have repeatedly for years declared the land safe for unrestricted use.

But the secretive Cold War legacy of using radioactive plutonium and uranium to make triggers for thousands of the nuclear weapons wielded to deter the Soviet Union is haunting this project anew.

Former Rocky Flats radiation control technician John Barton, who worked for the Department of Energy at the site from 1982 to 2003, testified that he saw scores of the pea-green “glove boxes” where workers handled plutonium and uranium dumped and buried on a hillside area the size of three football fields near the boundary of today’s fenced off-limits core area. Barton also told of a fire in a building that likely spread plutonium particles around the property. And he testified that a 55-gallon waste barrel found on what is now the refuge in an old clay mine pond that was not covered by the $7.7 billion Superfund cleanup likely contained plutonium, like the 60 barrels a day that were filled and shipped off site. Pond water never was tested for radioactive contaminants as it should have been, Barton testified.

“The taking down of Rocky Flats was a good thing. But they didn’t go far enough,” said Barton, who has had cancer removed twice in the aftermath of his federal service.

His motive for speaking out now? “I don’t want kids exposed to it,” he said quietly outside the courtroom.

Two other experts who have tested dirt on and off the property warned that hot spots containing billions of plutonium particles easily could spread them to people. Inhalation of plutonium is the most deadly type of exposure, experts said. And another who has studied biological effects of radiation after nuclear disasters abroad testified that no level of plutonium is safe and that inhalation of a single particle could cause harm.

The U.S. nuclear weapons complexes face similar difficulties elsewhere.  A federal judge recently shut down cleanup activities at Hanford, in Washington state, following revelations that workers were spreading plutonium particles, a deadly hazard worsened by wind.

On Tuesday, Boulder-based attorney Randall Weiner argued that the state department of health and EPA assurances that the refuge is safe were based on tests of soil conducted more than 10 years ago, rather than the dust that — combined with high winds common at Rocky Flats, 16 miles northwest of downtown Denver — could spread potentially deadly plutonium to visitors at the refuge.

“Unless it is entirely clear, your honor, why shouldn’t the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service look at this?”

Federal failure to conduct a review required under the National Environmental Policy Act “would be a travesty, your honor,” Weiner said.

“But we’ve got these reports,” Brimmer countered, “from agencies whose expertise is in assessing risk to human health. And they say the refuge is OK.”

Fish and Wildlife managers at least should ask EPA officials whether the current configuration of trails and a visitors center at Rocky Flats would be safe, Weiner said. “Why doesn’t this agency make that request to the EPA? … That is a reasonable thing for a government agency to do and they have not done it yet,” he said.

“It really is incumbent on this agency to at least make a finding of ‘no significant impact’ before it opens the refuge trails. … The public is waiting for an answer,” he argued, citing multiple metro school districts that have barred educational visits to the refuge.

Local governments now are planning to conduct new tests of dirt at the refuge, relying on a grant, without state department of health assistance.

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“Why can’t they wait another month?” Weiner implored. “Why can’t they wait until October 15 until the promised confirmatory soil sampling has been done?”

The Fish and Wildlife Service in recent years has embraced the mission of helping an increasingly urbanized society keep up connections with the natural environment. The Rocky Flats refuge, like the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge, with its robust bison herd just northeast of Denver, are seen as centerpiece models in that national effort.

“The beauty of Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge is that it serves as an urban oasis for people, rare native plant communities, and a diversity of wildlife,” agency spokesman Michael D’Agostino said.

“As development and urbanization continue along Colorado’s scenic Front Range, this refuge’s largely undisturbed prairie grassland, wetland and woodland habitats will become increasingly important respites.”

  • Matthew Jonas, Daily Camera

    The Lindsay Ranch homestead is seen at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson County, Colorado on May 14, 2018.

  • Joe Amon, The Denver Post

    Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge on May 1, 2018 in Golden.

  • Elk cross the prairie at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson County, Colorado on May 14, 2018. (Photo by Matthew Jonas/Staff Photographer)

  • Matthew Jonas, Daily Camera

    Wild Iris flowers, Iris missouriensis, are seen at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson County, Colorado on May 14, 2018.

  • Matthew Jonas, Daily Camera

    An antler shed from an Elk is seen lying in the grass near the Lindsay Ranch at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson County, Colorado on May 14, 2018.

  • Photo by Matthew Jonas/Staff Photographer

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Supervisory Ranger Cindy Souders, center, points out different features of the Lindsay Ranch at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson County, Colorado on May 14, 2018.

  • Matthew Jonas, Daily Camera

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Refuge Manager Daivd Lucas is seen walking through the grass at the Lindsay Ranch at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson County, Colorado on May 14, 2018.

  • Matthew Jonas, Daily Camera

    The Department of Energy boundary at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge is seen in Jefferson County, Colorado on May 14, 2018.

  • Joe Amon, The Denver Post

    Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge on May 1, 2018 in Golden.

  • A Sand Lily, Leucocrinum montanum, is seen at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson County, Colorado on May 14, 2018. (Photo by Matthew Jonas/Staff Photographer)

  • Joe Amon, The Denver Post

    Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge on May 1, 2018 in Golden.

  • The Lindsay Ranch barn is seen at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson County, Colorado on May 14, 2018. (Photo by Matthew Jonas/Staff Photographer)

  • Joe Amon, The Denver Post

    Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge on May 1, 2018 in Golden.

  • Joe Amon, The Denver Post

    Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge on May 1, 2018 in Golden.

  • Locoweed is seen flowering at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson County, Colorado on May 14, 2018. (Photo by Matthew Jonas/Staff Photographer)

  • Dan Elliott, AP file photo

    FILE--In this Aug. 11, 2017, file photo, visitors approach a former ranch house and barn during a guided hike on the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge near Denver. The Colorado town of Superior, which is near the former nuclear weapons plant, has filed a lawsuit to keep part of the site from opening to the public as a wildlife refuge and has asked a federal judge to keep the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from opening Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge, saying the agency hasn't adequately studied safety,

  • Joe Amon, The Denver Post

    Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge on May 1, 2018 in Golden.

  • Matthew Jonas, Daily Camera

    The Denver skyline is seen from the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson County, Colorado on May 14, 2018.

  • A Barrel Cactus is seen at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson County, Colorado on May 14, 2018. (Photo by Matthew Jonas/Staff Photographer)

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Colorado man gets 5 years for killing friend during game of Russian roulette in Westminster

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 6:35pm

BRIGHTON — A 22-year-old man who killed a friend during a game of Russian roulette in suburban Denver has been sentenced to five years in prison.

Marquis Brooks was sentenced Tuesday for the Feb. 22 death of 22-year-old Zachary Espinosa-Bivens at an apartment complex in Westminster. Brooks previously pleaded guilty to several charges, including manslaughter.

Investigators say he had been drinking, using drugs and talking about suicide when he brought out his gun and unloaded all but one bullet. Brooks then pointed it at his own head and pulled the trigger. The gun did not fire.

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He then pointed it at Espinosa-Bivens’ head and fired, killing him.

Prosecutors say Brooks fled the scene without trying to help his friend.

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As MLB mulls rule changes, union hints at work stoppage

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 6:07pm

WASHINGTON — Major League Baseball wants a broad discussion with players about rule changes to combat decreased offense and longer games, an initiative likely to be met by a testy union stung by declining free-agent prices and already raising the possibility of a work stoppage after the 2021 season.

Commissioner Rob Manfred and players’ association head Tony Clark outlined their differing agendas during separate sessions with the Baseball Writers’ Association of America before Tuesday night’s All-Star Game.

“There is a growing consensus or maybe even better an existing consensus among ownership that we need to have a really serious conversation about making some changes to the way the game is being played,” Manfred said. “We are not at the point where I can articulate for you what particular rule changes might get serious consideration. I can tell you the issues that concern people: I think that the period of time between putting balls in play, the number of strikeouts, to a lesser extent the number of home runs, the significance of the shift and what it’s done to the game, the use of relief pitchers and the way starting pitchers are going to be used.”

Clark repeatedly maintained players are reluctant to change as “stewards of the game.”

“We may get to a point where those coming to the ballpark or have an interest in coming to the ballpark for whatever reason aren’t 100 percent certain that what they are see is the type of game that they want to see,” he said.

More than 100 free agents remained unsigned when spring training began this year. Many agreed to deals at a fraction of the price they thought they were worth and for fewer years than they expected.

“What we experienced last offseason was a direct attack on free agency, which has been a bedrock of our economic system, and if that is going to be different, then we have some very difficult decisions to make moving forward,” Clark said.

Baseball had eight work stoppages from 1972-95 but has had labor peace since. The current five-year contract runs through the 2021 season, and Clark left open a possible return to the era of strife.

“To the extent there are challenges to those rights, historically I would suggest those have manifested themselves in a particular way,” he said.

The union filed a grievance in February against Miami, Oakland, Pittsburgh and Tampa Bay, accusing the teams of failing to appropriately spend revenue-sharing money in an effort to improve their on-field product. Manfred dismissed the allegations, saying the grievance was filed “really for publicity reasons.”

Manfred said the lack of interest in free agents was due to the dearth of quality.

“At the end of the year you’ll look at the performance of those players,” he said, “I’m pretty sure, based on what’s already in the books, you’re going to make the judgment that the clubs made sound decisions as to how those players should be valued.”

Management is alarmed by what is taking place on the field. Strikeouts (24,537) are on track to surpass hits (24,314) for the first time. Strikeouts also are likely to set a record for the 12th straight season, and this year’s average of 17.0 per game is up from 12.6 in 2005. The current big league batting average of .247 would be the lowest since 1972.

There have been 20,587 shifts on balls in play, according to Baseball Info Solutions. That projects to a full-season total of 34,668 — up 29.8 percent from last year and an increase from 6,882 for the entire 2013 season. That has decreased the batting average of stars such as Washington’s Bryce Harper, who is hitting just .214.

And the average attendance of 28,568 is down from the 30,159 at the break last year, when the final figure was 30,042. MLB has not dropped below 30,000 since 2002.

Manfred blamed early season bad weather.

“We’ve made up some ground,” he said. “We were down as much as 8, 9 (percent) early, we were back to like 5.5 percent down, and I’m optimistic.”

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Lack of competitiveness among rebuilding teams also is a likely factor. Three teams are on track to lose 100 or more games, which would match the record set in 2002, and five others are on a pace for 90 or more defeats.

Clark called the attendance drop “dramatic” and said while weather is partly to blame “the concerns that fans have in regards to the competitive integrity piece is one of them” along with “players being moved from teams that fans had a connection with.”

While he wouldn’t cite teams for tanking, he said it appears many clubs are deciding to rebuild if analytics tell them they can’t compete to win the World Series.

“This is only what I am hearing, that teams are making decisions against the backdrop of what they believe their roster is going to yield and the landing place of where their team is going to be at the end of the year, that those data points suggest if you’re not in a particular place, then it may make more sense not to look to be the last team standing,” he said.

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Ferguson: American core of golf stars have grown up together

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 5:03pm

CARNOUSTIE, Scotland — Justin Thomas lost a skin by making bogey. He won a bet by making par.

All on the same hole.

The difference — a big difference — was in the clubs Thomas used to cover the 472 yards on the 15th hole at Carnoustie. And that one hole during a British Open practice round Tuesday, with a little drama and a lot of laughs, captured the essence of this growing class of young American stars.

They’ve known each other since they were teenagers.

The fun hasn’t left them, even as the trophies, fame and money keep piling up.

Patrick Cantlay, who shot 60 on the PGA Tour the summer after his freshman year at UCLA, won six skins from Thomas and Jordan Spieth with a routine par. Thomas was far more interested in a side bet with Michael Greller, who caddied for Thomas and then Spieth when they were amateurs, and left his job as a sixth-grade math teacher to work for Spieth when he turned pro.

The challenge was for Thomas to make par using only an 8-iron.

Once he got it in the fairway, Spieth came over to advise him how to navigate the pot bunkers more than 200 yards away. The ball stopped rolling, finally, about a yard short of a bunker to the left of the green. Getting it over the bunker with that club was going to be a problem.

“Where’s my caddie?” Thomas said in mock panic.

Spieth was preparing to hit a bunker shot on the other side of the fairway when he looked over and said, “Sorry,” then ran to Thomas for more consultation. He told Thomas to open the face of the 8-iron and slide it under the firm turf. Spieth pointed to a spot on the slope beyond the bunker. Greller watched nervously as Thomas pulled it off to perfection, the ball rolling out to 3 feet.

With the leading edge of the 8-iron, he knocked it in for a 4. And then, as usual, they all debated the size of the bet.

This stuff goes on all the time, involving any number of players.

Spieth spoke of the players who came out of the high school Class of 2011 who have gone on to star on the big stage. It includes Spieth and his three legs of the career Grand Slam, Thomas and his recent albeit brief rise to No. 1 in the world after winning the PGA Championship, Daniel Berger and his passion at the Presidents Cup and Xander Schauffele, the most recent PGA Tour rookie of the year.

There are others a few years older, such as two-time U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka, Masters champion Patrick Reed and Cantlay.

They faced one another across America as juniors and into college, and it hasn’t really stopped.

“It’s kind of a natural transition into kind of fearless golf at the highest level,” Spieth said. “I think that’s what you’re seeing out of 20-something-year-olds. The game is getting athletic, but as far as the mental side of it, guys have just been playing against better fields on better golf courses because of the junior and amateur circuit.”

Tiger Woods spends plenty of time around most of them, if not with Thomas, Berger and Rickie Fowler at home in Florida, then with Spieth during a practice round at the Shinnecock Hills. This is one area of the game to which Woods can’t relate.

He turned pro and had two PGA Tour victories at age 20, a rarity in 1996. Players he grew up around in California, like Pat Perez and Chris Riley, took longer to get out of school and make it on tour. By then, Woods was a dominant figure in golf. His friends — Mark O’Meara, Fred Couples — were in their 40s.

“So yeah, you see these guys are really close, but they’ve been close since junior golf and made it out here on tour very quickly and almost the same time frame,” Woods said. “So I think that’s one of the reasons why you see them hanging around with each other all the time.”

Koepka, Spieth, Thomas and Reed have combined to win the last five majors. All of them are Americans, all in their 20s.

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There have been natural moments of jealously, but far more motivation.

“It is a very unique group of us, I guess you could say,” Thomas said. “Obviously, we want to beat each other’s brains in. I never want to lose to any of my friends, especially my best friends. Sometimes it’s harder losing to your closest friends than it is someone you don’t even know, whether it’s bragging rights or whatever it is.”

Six years ago, the U.S. had only three players in their 20s at the Ryder Cup. Two of them, Webb Simpson and Keegan Bradley, were recent major champions. Now, six of the top eight players in the current Ryder Cup standings are still in their 20s, and four are major winners.

“There’s no doubt about it and there’s no other way to put it than they have an exceptional bunch of players at the moment,” said Tommy Fleetwood of England. “It just so happens that it has been a run of American golfers that have won majors. But at the same time, they’ve generally been the best players in the world.”

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Amazon hiring 1,500 for new distribution facility in Thornton

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 4:55pm

Amazon has put an order out for 1,500 workers to staff a new fulfillment center opening in Thornton this fall. But given metro Denver’s super-low unemployment rate of 2.3 percent, can the local economy deliver?

The country’s largest online retailer, which just hosted its Prime Day event, is about to find out.

“We are hiring quickly to open later this summer,” said Lauren Lynch, a spokeswoman for the online retailer. The new wave of hires will more than double the 1,300 people the Seattle-based company now employs at two facilities in Aurora.

Amazon is looking for pickers, packers and distribution workers, along with managers and a smaller number of support staff in areas like quality control, information technology and human resources.

The basic job of putting items into boxes for shipping starts at $12 an hour, with higher pay based on experience. Lynch emphasized that after a few months, workers will receive wage increases.

“With everything taken into account, Amazon wages are 30 percent more than traditional retail roles, and they include full benefits from Day 1,” she said.

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The company can adjust the starting wage if it proves too low, she said. But Amazon is counting on its benefits package, which starts on an employee’s first day, to set it apart.

The company provides medical coverage, including dental and vision, and up to 20 weeks of paid parental leave. It also provides performance-based bonuses, a 401(k) plan and company stock awards.

“Any employer that is offering health care will instantly have a leg up. That seems to be one of the primary concerns for job seekers,” said Kyle Kensing, an online content editor at San Diego-based CareerCast, which track labor market trends.

Amazon also realizes that not everyone it hires wants to stay long-term. Its Career Choice program pre-pays 95 percent of the tuition for courses in fields that are in demand, areas like IT programming, radiology, nursing, etc. The company is also known for providing “pay to quit” bonuses to more tenured workers who want to move on.

The Thornton facility, at 855,000 square feet and four-levels, is state-of-the-art. Workers will stand at stations, picking items to ship from trays brought to them by robots that roam the massive warehouse floor.

The robotic facility, near I-25 and 144th Avenue, will distribute small- and medium-sized items and should allow for quicker delivery of orders in the metro area.

A 1 million-square-foot fulfillment center in Aurora that opened last September employs 1,000 workers. It distributes larger items, like canoes, bikes and area rugs. Workers there use small vehicles to drive to and pick up items.

Amazon hired 900 workers in a little over a month last August and September. The unemployment rate was slightly higher then, 2.7 percent versus 2.3 percent in May, when 37,800 people were actively looking for work in metro Denver.

Amazon also offered higher starting pay last year, $12.50 an hour. The $12 a hour wage now offered isn’t too much more than the state minimum of $10.20 an hour.

But Amazon should be able to draw workers from positions paying a similar wage with more limited benefits, Kensing predicts.

That said, Amazon’s reputation as an employer took a hit in April after author James Bloodworth went undercover at a warehouse in England. He found employees so fearful of missing productivity targets that they relieved themselves in bottles rather than running to distant bathrooms. Amazon disputed the allegations Bloodworth raised and said it provides a safe and positive workplace.

Lynch said the new distribution facility will make it easier for merchants in the area who fulfill orders through Amazon to get their products to market. It also should speed up how long it takes Amazon orders made locally to get delivered.

“Colorado is a big deal,” she said of the new facility.

Those interested in learning more about jobs at the Thornton fulfillment center can visit www.amazon.com/denverjobs. Amazon is also hosting a job fair at 11860 Pecos St. Suite 2200 in Westminster from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. through this Friday.

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Colorado denies widow half of late husband’s workers’ compensation due to his marijuana use

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 3:39pm

DENVER — The state of Colorado is denying half the workers’ compensation death benefits to a woman whose husband died while working on a ski lift because he had marijuana in his system.

KMGH-TV reports Erika Lee’s husband, Adam Lee, was crushed to death in December underneath a ski escalator in Loveland.

Erika says she’s frustrated the system is saying “because he smoked a legal substance, we are going to take away your benefits from you and your kids.”

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Colorado law allows state workers’ compensation companies to cut benefits by 50 percent if tests return positive for marijuana or any other controlled substance.

Erika plans to appeal the decision by Pinnacol Assurance, a quasi-state workers’ compensation agency, to cut her benefits. A hearing is scheduled before an administrative law judge in the coming months.

___

Information from: KMGH-TV, http://www.thedenverchannel.com

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Loveland man sentenced to 44 years in infant son’s death

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 3:31pm

FORT COLLINS — As Gabriel Navarrete viewed video footage of his 8-month-old smiling in the tub, he doubled over his handcuffs and wept.

Others also cried at Navarrete’s sentencing Tuesday, when the case surrounding the death of Adrian Dominguez came to a close.

Larimer County Sheriff's OfficeGabriel Navarrete

Navarrete, who pleaded guilty in the death of his son, appeared before 8th Judicial District Judge Stephen Howard. Howard sentenced Navarrete to 44 years in the Department of Corrections. After serving his years, Navarrete is expected to be deported back to El Salvador, his country of origin, according to Howard.

Navarrete had faced a maximum of 48 years and a minimum of 16 years behind bars. He has 200 days’ credit toward his sentence; the case surrounding the death of his 8-month-old son has taken nearly seven months to conclude.

Aided by a translator, Navarrete gave a final statement.

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Read the full story at reporterherald.com.

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Aurora Police charge individual accused of slapping a special needs child on school bus

Denver Post Aurora - July 17, 2018 - 2:58pm

The Aurora Police Department charged someone following an incident in which a paraprofessional allegedly slapped a 7-year-old special needs child on a school bus Monday.

The incident, which police confirmed happened, occurred on a school bus Monday in the area of East 12th Avenue and Ironton Street in Aurora. Police were notified of the situation around 5 p.m., according to Aurora Police spokesman Bill Hummel.

Denver 7 news (via family attorney)A photo of the boy allegedly slapped by a paraprofessional.

Hummel couldn’t provide additional details, adding the incident was now in the hands of the 18th judicial district.

Aurora Public Schools said they’re investigating the report of an employee who struck one of their students.

“We take this matter seriously and are taking appropriate disciplinary action,” read a statement from Corey Christiansen, spokesman for the school district. “We want to emphasize that we do not tolerate inappropriate behavior by staff.”

Igor Raykin, an attorney for the boy’s family, said he viewed surveillance video taken from the bus ride.

“It absolutely, categorically, unequivocally shows a slap,” Raykin said. “It’s a clear view. There’s no other way to interpret it.”

Raykin described the video, which he said was about 45 seconds long. The 7-year-old boy  was sitting in the front row of the bus, interacting with a teacher’s aide sitting in the row next to him, he said. The boy and the aide were smiling and playing, Raykin said, until the child reached over to grab the man’s sunglasses or touch his head.

“The paraprofessional rises up, reaches back and slaps him across the face,” Raykin said. “The child is terrified and immediately recoils and slides all the way toward the window.”

Raykin is withholding the name of the child and child’s family for safety and privacy reasons.

The attorney said the school district declined to give him the name of the teacher’s aide.

Raykin notified the school district of an intent to sue and is considering a civil rights complaint because of the boy’s special needs.

Because of privacy laws and the open investigation, the school district said they’re unable to share more information at this time.

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This is a developing story that will be updated as more information becomes available.

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Aurora Police charge individual accused of slapping a special needs child on school bus

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 2:58pm

The Aurora Police Department charged someone following an incident in which a paraprofessional allegedly slapped a 7-year-old special needs child on a school bus Monday.

The incident, which police confirmed happened, occurred on a school bus Monday in the area of East 12th Avenue and Ironton Street in Aurora. Police were notified of the situation around 5 p.m., according to Aurora Police spokesman Bill Hummel.

Denver 7 news (via family attorney)A photo of the boy allegedly slapped by a paraprofessional.

Hummel couldn’t provide additional details, adding the incident was now in the hands of the 18th judicial district.

Aurora Public Schools said they’re investigating the report of an employee who struck one of their students.

“We take this matter seriously and are taking appropriate disciplinary action,” read a statement from Corey Christiansen, spokesman for the school district. “We want to emphasize that we do not tolerate inappropriate behavior by staff.”

Igor Raykin, an attorney for the boy’s family, said he viewed surveillance video taken from the bus ride.

“It absolutely, categorically, unequivocally shows a slap,” Raykin said. “It’s a clear view. There’s no other way to interpret it.”

Raykin described the video, which he said was about 45 seconds long. The 7-year-old boy  was sitting in the front row of the bus, interacting with a teacher’s aide sitting in the row next to him, he said. The boy and the aide were smiling and playing, Raykin said, until the child reached over to grab the man’s sunglasses or touch his head.

“The paraprofessional rises up, reaches back and slaps him across the face,” Raykin said. “The child is terrified and immediately recoils and slides all the way toward the window.”

Raykin is withholding the name of the child and child’s family for safety and privacy reasons.

The attorney said the school district declined to give him the name of the teacher’s aide.

Raykin notified the school district of an intent to sue and is considering a civil rights complaint because of the boy’s special needs.

Because of privacy laws and the open investigation, the school district said they’re unable to share more information at this time.

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This is a developing story that will be updated as more information becomes available.

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Residents of Falcon Highlands Metro District in El Paso County warned to boil water before drinking

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 2:49pm

Residents of the Falcon Highlands Metro District are being warned to boil tap water before drinking it, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes or preparing food until further notice.

The district had a “booster station failure” Monday that resulted in a significant loss of pressure in the drinking water system, according to a notice posted on the district’s website.

“A loss of system pressure can introduce disease-causing organisms into the water system,” the warning read. “These organisms include bacteria, viruses and parasites, which can cause short-term effects, such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea and associated headaches.”

Residents are instructed to bring all water to a boil for three minutes and let it cool before using or rely to bottled water.

Infants, expectant mothers, the elderly and those with compromised immune systems may be at an increased risk and should seek a physician’s advice before drinking the water, the warning said.

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The district said they will inform residents when tests show bacteria levels have dropped and boiling can stop. In the meantime, officials are flushing the system.

Officials expect the issue to be resolved Thursday.

The Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline can be contacted at 1-800-426-4791.

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Dom Collier, former Denver East and CU Buffs guard, to begin pro career in Germany

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 2:34pm

Dom Collier probably will spend the rest of his summer brushing up on his German.

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On Tuesday, it was announced that Collier has signed his first professional contract with FC Schalke 04 in the German Pro A league. The former Colorado Buffaloes guard and Denver East standout agreed to a one-year deal.

A two-time winner of the Denver Post’s Mr. Basketball award, Collier led East to a state title at the CU Events Center at the end of his senior season in 2014. He endured an up-and-down career as a homegrown star at CU, yet over his four-year career Collier filled a number of roles in coach Tad Boyle’s program. Surviving the peaks and valleys he experienced on the floor likely will help Collier mentally at the next level.

After struggling as a freshman Collier took over as the lead point guard during the 2015-16 season, which ended with the Buffaloes’ fourth NCAA Tournament bid in five seasons. That year proved to be a microcosm of Collier’s career. His .444 3-point percentage trailed only teammate George King among the Pac-12’s leaders, but his assist-to-turnover rate of 1.32 fell short of expectations.

Read the full story at Buffzone.com.

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Colorado legislation aims to bolster failing foster system

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 2:19pm

DENVER — Sweeping legislative reforms to Colorado’s troubled foster care program take effect in August with the goal of revamping a system where kids graduate from high school at lower rates than homeless children.

Crafted with the help of foster parents as well as former foster kids who aged out of the system, the package of legislation aims to provide more stability for children, the majority of whom change schools at least once per year — to the detriment of their education.

Lawmakers say it’s among the most comprehensive package of reforms that has been attempted in the nation. And while foster care problems are pervasive across the U.S., Colorado’s system is particularly challenged.

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In 2017, less than 1 in 4 foster kids in Colorado graduated high school in four years, according to the state Department of Education. That’s worse than the rate for homeless kids, who graduate at a 56 percent clip in Colorado.

Nationally, around half of foster kids graduate on time.

Reggie Bicha, executive director of the Colorado Department of Human Services, points to instability as a key driver of the broader challenges foster kids face.

Around 55 percent of Colorado’s 6,500 foster children changed schools at least once last year. A Denver Post investigation published this spring found that more than 1,500 foster kids “aged out” in the last five years — meaning they were emancipated without being adopted, reunified with a parent or set up with a legal guardian.

Without a support system as they transition to adulthood, the Post found, these kids often wind up unemployed, homeless or in jail.

“Too many kids are set up to age out of the system,” Bicha said. And “once you’re out, you’re always out,” he said, meaning those who find independence too challenging can’t go back for help.

One bill set to become law in August will provide a mechanism for 18- to 21 year-olds to re-enter care after they have been emancipated. Another provides funding to implement a 2015 federal law aimed at providing kids with transportation so they can stay in the same school, even if they move to a new district. It requires school districts and child welfare departments to work out the logistics.

Lawmakers also passed a bill to allow foster parents to obtain medical and educational information for their foster child — records they can’t obtain today.

“Imagine providing foster care to a 10-year-old, but being told you can’t get educational records, or can’t get medical records,” Bicha said.

The administration, meanwhile, has committed to an ambitious goal of its own — recruiting enough new foster parents to close a projected shortfall of 1,200 caretakers within the next five years. Prospective foster parents and others who want to help can learn out more at co4kids.org.

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JeffCo Sheriff’s Office locate missing developmentally-disabled man

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 1:55pm

The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office located a missing developmentally-disabled man officials were searching for Tuesday.

Jefferson County authorities are asking for help searching for Scott Guffey, 33, who went missing Tuesday morning. Guffey functions at the level of a child, officials said.

Scott Guffey, 33, was found “safe and sound” just before 4 p.m. after last being seen shortly after 10:30 a.m. near North Turkey Creek Road and Danks Lane in Evergreen.

Guffey functions at the level of an 8-to-10-year-old, according to the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office.

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2018 fantasy football QB rankings: How to evaluate Aaron Rodgers, Case Keenum and Andrew Luck?

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 1:52pm

In advising, “Wait to draft a QB,” no one sounds particularly smart at this point — just aware of the blindingly obvious (at least for one-QB leagues). That said, some signal-callers provide far more upside than others, and fantasy drafters confident in their ability to pluck value from unheralded players at other positions can choose to splurge on an elite passer.

Still, there are about 20 players here I’d be OK with as the top QB on my roster, plus a few more I could live with while working on ways to acquire better options. And who knows, maybe something unexpectedly good will emerge from the Bills’ depth chart. OK, maybe not.

1. Aaron Rodgers, Packers (Off week: 7)

A broken collarbone limited Rodgers to just seven games last season, so it’s hard to get too worried about the relatively low yards-per-game (239.3) and interception-rate (2.5 percent) figures he posted in that span. Considering that in every season but one in which he has played at least 15 games, Rodgers has finished first or second in fantasy scoring among QBs (and the one outlier, in 2015, was a hardly disastrous seventh-place showing), it only makes sense to place him atop this list. The one outlier in the list above was 2015 when he finished seventh and then he threw for a league-high 40 TDs in 2016. A longtime favorite target, Jordy Nelson, is gone, but Davante Adams appears ready to make the leap to WR1 status and the Packers brought in an end-zone maven in TE Jimmy Graham.

2. Russell Wilson, Seahawks (7)

Rebounding from an injury-plagued 2016 season that saw him land outside the top 10 in QB scoring for the first time — he plummeted all the way down to 11th — Wilson finished No. 1 among all players last season in standard scoring, with only Todd Gurley topping him in PPR formats. While Wilson’s yards per attempt fell to a career low (7.2) in 2017, he led the NFL with 34 TD passes and was back to bedeviling defenses with his feet, rushing for 586 yards and three scores. Seattle has made moves to improve its offensive line, but the team took major losses on defense as the “Legion of Boom” was all but dismantled, creating conditions under which the Seahawks may call a higher percentage of passing plays than in recent memory.

3. Tom Brady, Patriots (11)

Brady turns 41 next month, lost an explosive WR in Brandin Cooks and will be without another top WR, Julian Edelman, for the first four weeks of the season. But will any of that matter much? History says probably not, as Brady has proved as remarkably consistent as he has been durable, playing in all 16 games in 14 of the past 16 years (with only 12 games played in 2016 because of his Deflategate suspension), and finishing as a top-11 QB in all but one of those seasons. That includes a fourth-place finish in 2017. New England still has kingpin TE Rob Gronkowski, as well as promising new pass-catchers such as WR Jordan Matthews and first-round rookie RB Sony Michel.

4. Deshaun Watson, Texans (10)

If it’s smart not to draw too much pessimism from Rodgers’s abbreviated 2017 season, it’s probably also wise not to get overly enthused about Watson’s own seven-game campaign, even though a fair amount of excitement is warranted. After all, the former Clemson star took the NFL by storm, averaging by far the most fantasy points per game (24.1) of any QB, while showing the same ability to rise to the occasion he displayed in college. He is on track to make a full recovery from the torn knee ligament that ended his rookie season, but it may affect his dashing style, and a greater concern could be how far his touchdown rate falls from its ludicrously high level of 9.3 percent.

5. Cam Newton, Panthers (4)

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One way to look at Newton’s fantasy finishes over the past four seasons, 17-1-18-2, is to think of him as a boom-or-bust prospect at a position marked by steady alternatives. Another way is to add in his finishes from the previous three seasons, 3-4-3, and realize that the Carolina QB is much more likely than not to turn in a top-five campaign. Known for his fantasy-friendly rushing prowess, Newton actually notched a career-high in yards on the ground (754) last season, and he gets a healthy Greg Olsen back, as well as a first-round WR in D.J. Moore.

6. Carson Wentz, Eagles (9)

In his second season, Wentz’s year was similar to Watson’s — electrifying and injury-shortened. But while he kept up his strong play over nearly twice as many games, his recovery timetable could sideline him for the start of this season. Would-be owners who don’t mind spending a roster spot on a rare QB handcuff could protect themselves by drafting Super Bowl MVP Nick Foles in the final rounds, and in Wentz, they’d be getting someone who was leading the NFL in passing touchdowns and passer rating when he went down. The North Dakota State product was looking like the Next Big Thing in the NFL, almost literally, as he used his size and exceptional mobility to shake off or elude tacklers before launching downfield strikes. As with Watson, his astronomical TD percentage (7.5) seems certain to tumble.

7. Drew Brees, Saints (6)

A player whose touchdown percentage is likely to rise from last year, Brees threw for his fewest scores (23) and yardage (4,334) since arriving in New Orleans in 2006. That had much to do with a vastly improved defense, not to mention a top-notch RB combo in Alvin Kamara and Mark Ingram, and those trends could continue — at least after Ingram returns from his four-game ban. Add in the fact that Brees is 39 and we might never see him threaten 5,000 yards and 40 TDs again, but he still has impeccable skills (leading the NFL in completion percentage and yards per attempt last season), talented receivers and a dome-heavy schedule.

8. Matthew Stafford, Lions (6)

As with Brees, Stafford isn’t likely to post eye-popping numbers this year but is very likely to give owners a top-10 season. That’s what he has done for each of the past three years and four of the past five, and if anything, his supporting cast has improved. Detroit has been steadily building one of the league’s best offensive lines, and if Kenny Golladay builds on his intriguing rookie season, he will join Golden Tate and Marvin Jones in giving Stafford a trio of dangerous WRs.

9. Ben Roethlisberger, Steelers (7)

Talk of Roethlisberger’s injury-prone nature has been a bit overblown, considering he’s missed 12 starts over his past seven seasons, and at 36, he seems to have regained some enthusiasm for continuing his NFL career indefinitely. Big Ben certainly has reason to be eager for a season in which his all-universe WR, Antonio Brown, has a worthy complement in JuJu Smith-Schuster, with rookie James Washington bringing a stellar college résumé to the table as he vies for No. 3 WR duties. Of course, that spot was vacated by the talented Martavis Bryant, but he was also notoriously mercurial, and Roethlisberger will still be able to dump the ball off to his all-universe RB, Le’Veon Bell (provided he doesn’t sit out any portion of the season).

10. Kirk Cousins, Vikings (10)

Cousins has finished higher than 10th in QB scoring in each of the past three seasons, and now he goes to a team featuring the receiving talents of Stefon Diggs, Adam Thielen and Kyle Rudolph. He slots in at this slightly lower point because it still remains to be seen how he performs in a new environment, having left Washington and offensive-minded head coach Jay Gruden for a Minnesota team with a staunch defense and commitment to a conservative attack. The Vikings’ offensive line could also struggle a bit, giving the team further reason to prefer a ball-control style, but its weapons are too good to think Cousins won’t thrive.

11. Andrew Luck, Colts (9): If it looks like his surgically repaired shoulder will hold up — and if and when we see Luck actually throw passes downfield — his ranking will likely rise, but for now it is meant to reflect his risk/reward status.

12. Jimmy Garoppolo, 49ers (11): There’s so much excitement for a guy who threw just six TD passes in his five starts last season, which might seem odd, but Garoppolo showed great command in completing 67.1 percent of his passes while throwing for over 308 yards per contest.

13. Marcus Mariota, Titans (8): He disappointed in 2017 but figures to benefit greatly from a coaching change in Tennessee that includes the addition of offensive coordinator Matt LaFleur, who helped engineer the Rams’ dramatic improvement last year.

14. Philip Rivers, Chargers (8): Rivers annually keeps his owners more than competitive at the position, and has a very nice-looking WR corps, but volume could be a slight issue if the Bolts’ defense lives up to its billing.

15. Alex Smith, Redskins (4): He shocked many with his suddenly aggressive play last season in Kansas City, but Smith has been on an upward trend for years, and he should be able to sustain a high level of play as Cousins’ replacement.

16. Patrick Mahomes, Chiefs (12): Owners could be in for a roller-coaster ride with this first-year QB, who has athleticism and arm strength to spare, plus a terrific group of receivers, but whose inexperience and aggressive instincts may lead to big week-to-week swings.

17. Jameis Winston, Buccaneers (5): After averaging over 300 yards passing in the 11 full games he played last season, and likely set for positive TD regression, Winston would be a contender for QB1 draft status except, of course, for his three-game suspension to start the season.

18. Matt Ryan, Falcons (8): Speaking of positive TD regression, Ryan should throw for some more scores after following up his 38-TD, NFL MVP campaign with a 2017 season in which he threw for just 20. He embodies the quality depth at QB.

19. Jared Goff, Rams (12): OK, we now can be sure he’s not a bust, but is Goff the QB1 he finished as last year? He threw just 477 passes but was very efficient, leading the league at 12.9 yards per completion, and the likelihood that he doesn’t hit on as many big plays and that defenses start to figure out coach Sean McVay’s schemes diminish Goff’s chances of returning to the top 12.

20. Dak Prescott, Cowboys (8): Prescott was predictably unable to repeat the remarkable efficiency he enjoyed as a rookie, but while he still managed an 11th-place finish last year, he was QB23 from Week 10 on and now will be working with a distinctly unimpressive receiving corps.

21. Blake Bortles, Jaguars (9): A mediocre talent but not as terrible as his many critics contend, and one with useful rushing totals, Bortles’ biggest problem going forward may be an imposing Jacksonville squad that fails to let him pad his stats in garbage time.

22. Derek Carr, Raiders (7): Carr’s TD passes have dropped from 32 to 28 to 22, his supporting cast is questionable and the jury is very much out on whether back-from-the-booth head coach Jon Gruden is fully plugged into this decade’s offensive concepts.

23. Mitchell Trubisky, Bears (5): By bringing in coach Matt Nagy and much-needed pass-catchers, Chicago has spurred hope it can make a Rams-like leap in Trubisky’s sophomore season, but that’s probably a bit too much to ask.

24. Eli Manning, Giants (9): His recent stats give cause to worry that Manning is about to fall off the performance cliff, but the Giants are committed to him and have assembled a fearsome-looking array of weapons.

25. Andy Dalton, Bengals (9): His fifth-place finish in 2013 is an increasingly distant, and bizarre, memory, Dalton has settled in under coach-for-life Marvin Lewis as a favorite of no one but the late-round-QB crowd.

26. Case Keenum, Broncos (10): Denver saw enough of Trevor Siemian, Brock Osweiler and Paxton Lynch to rightly view Keenum as a major upgrade, but the rest of us should simply see him as just competent enough to restore Demaryius Thomas and Emmanuel Sanders to fantasy relevance.

27. Ryan Tannehill, Dolphins (11): The last of the job-secure QBs, Tannehill wasn’t exactly setting the league on fire even before missing all of last season with a knee injury, but he offers a modicum of upside.

28. Tyrod Taylor, Browns (11): With running ability that has made him an occasional asset in fantasy and a strong arm that could pair well with Josh Gordon, Taylor may keep No. 1 overall pick Baker Mayfield pinned to the bench longer than some Browns fans want.

29. Sam Bradford, Cardinals (9): It’s probably less a question of when he will give way to hotshot rookie Josh Rosen, and more a question of when his body will gave way to injury, but Bradford is a good bet to play well as long as he remains upright.

30. Joe Flacco, Ravens (10): Has been given an improved supporting cast, and will likely be given time to show he can take advantage of it before Baltimore considers replacing him with rookie Lamar Jackson.

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Elizabeth Cambage scores WNBA-record 53 points for Dallas Wings over New York Liberty

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 1:45pm

DALLAS — Elizabeth Cambage scored a WNBA single-game record 53 points to help the Dallas Wings beat the New York Liberty 104-87 on Tuesday.

Cambage reached 50 points on a 3-point play with 2:19 remaining and broke Riquna Williams’ WNBA record of 51 points, set Sept. 8, 2013, on a wide open 3-pointer from the top of the key.

Cambage was 17 of 22 from the field with 10 rebounds and five blocks for her ninth double-double of the season. She made 15 of 16 free throws and outscored the Liberty’s starting lineup by 10 points.

Glory Johnson and Allisha Gray each added 13 points for Dallas (13-9), which won its first home game against New York since 2016.

Dallas coach Fred Williams was ejected from the game with 1:44 remaining in the third quarter. New York took its first lead of the game, 70-69, on the next possession, but Dallas opened the fourth quarter on a 12-3 run and cruised from there.

Kia Nurse scored 25 points, with four 3-pointers, for New York (7-15), which saw its two-game winning streak snapped. Tina Charles added 19 points.

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Repeat child sex offender exposed by vigilante Facebook group, arrested in Greeley

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 1:26pm

A registered sex offender was arrested last week in Greeley after becoming the focus of a sting operation by a vigilante group on Facebook.

Weld County JailTravis Joe Benson

Travis Joe Benson, 30, was arrested July 11 on suspicion of criminal attempted promotion of obscenity to a minor, a felony, and attempted sexual assault on a minor with a 10-year age difference, a misdemeanor. He remains incarcerated at the Weld County Jail on $10,000 bond.

Benson, who served eight years in prison in Wyoming for having a sexual relationship with a 15-year-old girl when he was 18, has twice been convicted for failing to register as a sex offender in Colorado, according to court records. He was given two years probation the first time in 2015 when he moved to Moffat County. He was sentenced to four years in prison a year later in Rio Blanco County, serving 18 months.

Benson was paroled to Greeley about two weeks ago. Homeless and without a car, Benson spent his first week in town at Respite Care at North Range Behavioral Health. As part of his parole conditions, Benson is prohibited from owning any devices that provide him with access to the internet, records stated. But one of the first things Benson did when he arrived in Greeley was purchase a smartphone. He then set up a profile on the dating app “Just Say Hi.”

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That’s where on July 8 Benson met “Gracie,” whom he thought was a 15-year-old Larimer County girl. “Gracie” was in fact a fake profile set up by Chantelle Hopkins, a member of “Hunted & Confronted,” a vigilante group on Facebook that focuses on repeat child sexual predators. Pretending to be the underage teenage girl, Hopkins spent the next three days sexting with Benson until the two finally decided to meet in front of a convenience store in the 1000 block of 13th Street in Greeley.

Read the full story on greeleytribune.com.

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Lafayette police increasing patrols in wake of east Boulder County auto theft reports

The Denver Post - July 17, 2018 - 1:16pm

The recent spate of vehicle-related crimes has bled over from Louisville — where residents have reported dozens of thefts in the past few months — and into Lafayette, police say.

In an email blast Monday, the Lafayette Police Department said that locals have increasingly reported incidents of auto thefts and thefts from vehicles “at and around residences,” similar to such crimes in neighboring east Boulder County communities.

“Groups of individuals are moving from community to community with the intent to steal anything of value,” the email blast reads, which adds that in the wake of reports, Lafayette police have begun increased neighborhood patrols using unmarked vehicles and other enforcement measures.

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Earlier this month, Louisville police said that more than 20 vehicle-related crimes were reported over just a 36-hour period; they were the latest in a string of thefts that have since resulted in multiple arrests.

Read the full story on timescall.com.

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