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WATCH: Jamaal Charles rumbles 12 yards for Broncos touchdown against Bills

September 24, 2017 - 11:12am

INCREDIBLE blocking by the @Broncos.

And @jcharles25 takes care of the rest.

END ZONE! #BroncosCountry pic.twitter.com/mKxZ9BGxEC

— NFL (@NFL) September 24, 2017

Jamaal Charles may be 30, but he showed he still has gas in the tank.

The Broncos running back rumbled 12 yards through the Bills defense early in the second quarter for a touchdown.

The score gave the Broncos a 10-7 lead.



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Walker Stapleton, Colorado’s treasurer, jumps into crowded GOP primary race for governor

September 24, 2017 - 11:00am

Walker Stapleton, Colorado’s treasurer, made official his expected bid for governor Saturday night, jumping into the crowded Republican primary contest for the job.

2018 candidates for Colorado governor

Who is running for governor of Colorado in 2018? (And who is on the fence?)

“As Governor, I will demand that Colorado’s government serves the taxpayers of Colorado, not special interest groups and government bureaucrats,” Stapleton said in a statement to announcing his campaign. “Our Department of Transportation is spending $150 million of your money on new offices, instead of putting that money towards much needed roads. Actions like this have left taxpayers stuck in traffic, while bureaucrats enjoy brand new offices. That is not government putting taxpayers first.”

An independent expenditure committee called Better Colorado Now and backing Stapleton has been raising money for months.

Stapleton, 43, is in his second term as Colorado’s treasurer and has ties to the Bush family.

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Already in the race on the Republican side are co-chairman of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign in Colorado Steve Barlock, 18th Judicial District Attorney George Brauchler, Larimer County Commissioner Lew Gaiter, former Parker Mayor Greg Lops, former state lawmaker and businessman Victor Mitchell and former investment banker Doug Robinson.

There are also a host of candidates running as Democrats, including businessman Noel Ginsburg, former state Sen. Mike Johnston, former treasurer Cary Kennedy, Lt. Gov. Donna Lynne and U.S. Rep. Jared Polis.

State Attorney General Cynthia Coffman has been mulling a run for governor but has yet to say whether she will get into the race or when she will decide.

Categories: All Denver News.

PHOTOS: The Denver Broncos play the Buffalo Bills at New Era Field

September 24, 2017 - 10:38am

The Buffalo Bills host the Denver Broncos on Sept. 24, 2017 at New Era Field in Orchard Park, N.Y.

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Von Miller among 32 Broncos players who take a knee for national anthem

September 24, 2017 - 10:12am

ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. — Thirty-two Broncos players took a knee during the national anthem Sunday ahead of their game against the Buffalo Bills. Star outside linebacker Von Miller was among them, and locked arms with inside linebacker Brandon Marshall.

Rookie left tackle Garett Bolles stood next to Miller and placed his hand on Miller’s shoulder. Kicker Brandon McManus and outside linebacker Kasim Edebali did the same as teammates knelt next to them.

Cornerback Chris Harris took a knee and raised his left hand in the air. Outside linebacker Shaquil Barrett and tight end Virgil Green both stood with their fists raised.

Head coach Vance Joseph and offensive coordinator Mike McCoy stood for the anthem.

Joseph broached the subject of protest directly and succinctly during the team’s Saturday night meeting. He told his players he supported them. He encouraged them to stick together and emphasized a focus on the game ahead, against the Bills. However they wished to address the matter, he would have their backs.

In the near-36 hours since President Donald Trump called on NFL owners to fire “son of a bitch” national anthem protesters, then doubled down on his stance via social media, NFL executives, owners, coaches and players responded with strong comments in support of their game and their athletes.

Broncos president/CEO Joe Ellis issued a statement to reiterate the team’s support of its players and “admiration for their dedication to making our team the absolute best it can be.” He didn’t name Trump, nor did he mention the president’s comments. General manager John Elway also spoke to Joseph and has been involved in the team’s discussions and handling of the matter internally.

Many other teams convened Saturday evening to decide what they would do before their games Sunday, be it a protest or show of unity or nothing at all. Before the Jacksonville’s game against the Ravens in London, Jaguars owner Shadid Khan, who donated $1 million to Trump’s presidential campaign, stood with his arms locked with tight end Marcedes Lewis and linebacker Telvin Smith. Dozens of players from both teams kneeled during the anthem.

“I met with our team captains prior to the game to express my support for them, all NFL players and the league following the divisive and contentious remarks made by President Trump, and was honored to be arm in arm with them, our teammates and our coaches during our anthem,” Khan told reporters after the game. “Our team and the National Football league reflects our nation, with diversity coming in many forms — race, faith, our views and our goals. We have a lot of work to do, and we can do it, but the comments by the president make it harder. That’s why it was important for us, and personally for me, to show the world that even if we may differ at times, we can and should be united in the effort to become better as people and a nation.”

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Over the past year, as many have taken Colin Kaepernick’s lead and kneeled for the national anthem in protest of social injustice and police brutality, not all players across NFL locker rooms have agreed with the protests.

Broncos defensive end Derek Wolfe was among those who stood for the anthem Sunday. He made it clear he believes in standing out of respect for service men and women. But he’s also offered his support of his teammates who have decided to protest. Marshall kneeled for seven games last season and lost a pair of endorsement deals and received numerous hate-filled and threatening messages from fans.

“Him getting hate mail like that, that’s also disgusting,” Wolfe told The Post. “Why do you want to take a step back as a human race? We’re all the same. We’re all human beings. It’s OK to be different.”

In a statement to ESPN’s Josina Anderson on Sunday morning, Wolfe said: “I stand because I respect the men who died in real battle so I have the freedom to battle on the field. Paying tribute to the men and women who have given their lives for our freedom is why I stand. But everyone these days likes to find a reason to protest and that’s their right. It’s America and you are free to speak your mind. I just feel it’s disrespectful to the ones who sacrificed their lives and it’s maybe the wrong platform. But like I said to each their own it’s AMERICA! The greatest country in the world and if you don’t think we are the greatest country in the world and you reside here, then why do you stay? A lot worse places in the world to call home. Proud to be an American.”

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Dominique Badji’s goal is not enough as Rapids fall to Whitecaps

September 24, 2017 - 9:57am

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Yordy Reyna had a goal and an assist to help the Vancouver Whitecaps beat the Colorado Rapids 2-1 on Saturday night.

Fredy Montero also had a goal and an assist for Vancouver (14-9-6), which moved four points clear atop Major League Soccer’s Western Conference and stretched its unbeaten streak to 5-0-2.

Despite the loss, Rapids interim coach Steve Cooke was happy with his team’s effort.

“I couldn’t be prouder of the players,” Cooke said. “They’re bitterly disappointed, they’re devastated they haven’t got a win or at least a point and that’s because they’ve been putting the work in. They have been doing everything they can possibly do to not only play well but keep making progress.”

Dominique Badji scored for last-place Colorado (7-17-5). It was the third goal in as many games for Badji, and his ninth of the season.

“It was a very good goal because it was quite opportunistic,” Cooke said. “Sometimes Dominique scores those goals where he breaks free and gets turned and runs at players, and tonight it was a real striker’s goal.”

The Rapids had a lot of the ball in the second half, finishing the game with a 57 to 43 percent edge in possession, but couldn’t find a second-half equalizer. Colorado was even with Vancouver on shots (14) but the Whitecaps put twice as many on target (8-4).

“I think it’s unlucky. We had the majority of possession, but they had the clearer chances, and that’s what it comes down to,” Badji said. “They capitalized on the one chance that they had, and we didn’t. Sometimes the game is cruel that way.”

After the Rapids got the tying goal ust before halftime on a sloppy sequence that will disappoint Vancouver head coach Carl Robinson, Montero chipped a pass over the top and into Reyna’s path in the 54th minute.

The Peruvian left Rapids defender Axel Sjoberg in his wake and beat goalkeeper Tim Howard, who was slow to react off his line, to the loose ball before burying his fifth goal in just 14 games.

“We played a tough team obviously at home, top of the table in the West, so they made it tough on us,” Rapids goalkeeper Tim Howard said. “We probably weren’t great at times, but I thought the second half was much better.”

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Reyna missed the first half of the season with a broken foot, but now has three goals in Vancouver’s last four games.

“That’s a group of players in there that are quiet, disappointed, and rightly so because they played exceptionally well and should have won the game,” Cooks said. “And I’m delighted they’re disappointed because it shows that they care, it shows that they’re a group of professionals that want to win games in this league and do well for each other.”

The Rapids will face a struggling FC Dallas side in a midweek game in Frisco.

“Every time we go down to Dallas we’re confident,” Badji said. “This result wasn’t what we wanted and we’re definitely going to do everything we can to get three points on Wednesday.”

The Denver Post contributed to this report.

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Cory Gardner says of Trump’s NFL comments: “There are far more important things that we ought to be focusing on”

September 24, 2017 - 9:47am

U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner said Sunday morning that “there are far more important things that we ought to be focusing on” when asked about President Donald Trump’s controversial weekend comments about the NFL.

“You spoke out about the president’s tepid reaction to the violence in Charlottesville,” John Dickerson said to the Colorado Republican on CBS’ “Face the Nation.” “The president has now stepped into the middle of a controversy about the NFL. I just wonder what you make of his remarks this week?”

“When it comes to this recent spat with the NFL, look, there are far more important things that we ought to be focusing on … North Korea, Iran, concern about the health care bill,” Gardner replied from his hometown, Yuma.

Trump sent several tweets during the weekend concerning players who kneel during the national anthem before NFL games after making fiery comments on the subject during a Friday night speech in Alabama.

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“Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, you’d say, ‘Get that son of a bitch off the field right now. Out! He’s fired,’” he said to loud applause.

Again in a Sunday morning tweet, Trump urged his supporters to take action: “If NFL fans refuse to go to games until players stop disrespecting our Flag & Country, you will see change take place fast. Fire or suspend!”

Trump’s comments drew swift rebukes from across the NFL, from players to coaches and even team owners. The entire Pittsburgh Steelers team — with the exception of one playerstayed in their locker room during the national anthem Sunday morning before their game against the Chicago Bears.

Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin reveals to @JamieErdahl that the team will not be participating in today’s national anthem. pic.twitter.com/5zihPWQsMv

— NFLonCBS (@NFLonCBS) September 24, 2017

Gardner also talked about the GOP’s so-called Graham-Cassidy health care legislation, which would unwind the Affordable Care Act — also known as Obamacare — during the television interview. He again did not definitively say whether he supports the measure.

“I think there’s still more information that we’re looking for,” Gardner said. “I think the (non-partisan Congressional Budget Office) will have a role to play in this. I believe there is information that will be coming through a committee hearing on Monday.”

Gardner also brushed off a question about whether Republicans are just trying to get the proposal, brought forth by Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, passed to make good on their seven-year promise to repeal Barack Obama’s health law.

It appears the GOP doesn’t have the votes to get the legislation passed. The support of U.S. Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, is a must-have if they want to advance the measure, but she said Sunday morning it would be “very difficult” to imagine a scenario where she would vote vote “yes.”

“This has nothing to do with politics, it has nothing to do with donors,” said Gardner, adding that Graham-Cassidy is about trying to fix the insurance premium increases sparked by Obamacare.

He said: “I think that the people who are opponents of the bill certainly want this to be about politics and not policy. But the bottom line is for the past seven years we have made it a very high priority to put something in place for the American people … that actually works.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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How NFL teams are reacting to Trump’s remarks about pro football

September 24, 2017 - 9:24am

A roundup of the social media comments, and national anthem protests and shows of unity across the NFL on Sunday:

Former NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue

Ex-NFL commish Paul Tagliabue: “To single out any particular group of players and call them SOBs, to me that’s insulting and disgraceful.” pic.twitter.com/5myythElSC

— Josh Katzenstein (@jkatzenstein) September 24, 2017

ARIZONA CARDINALS

UPDATED: #Falcons owner Arthur Blank to stand with team on the field  https://t.co/AqFD0stvQv

— D. Orlando Ledbetter (@DOrlandoAJC) September 24, 2017

ATLANTA FALCONS

BALTIMORE RAVENS

Ravens and Jaguars players locked arms while others knelt for the national anthem prior to the game in London. https://t.co/bP59FWysNd pic.twitter.com/tzgUpXIuXg

— SportsCenter (@SportsCenter) September 24, 2017

8:15 a.m.

Baltimore Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti says he “100 percent” supports his players’ decision to kneel during the national anthem ahead of Sunday’s game against the Jacksonville Jaguars at Wembley.

At least seven Ravens players and more than a dozen Jaguars players took a knee during the anthem while the rest of the players stood locked arm-in-arm in an apparent response to President Donald Trump, who said this week that NFL owners should fire those who disrespected the American flag.

But the Ravens issued a statement from Bisciotti minutes after kickoff, saying: “We recognize our players’ influence. We respect their demonstration and support them 100 percent. All voices need to be heard. That’s democracy in its highest form.”

Jaguars owner Shad Khan stood arm-in-arm with his players during the anthem.

7:30 a.m.

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About two dozen players, including Baltimore Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs and Jacksonville Jaguars running back Leonard Fournette, took a knee during the playing of the national anthem before the start of the teams’ game at Wembley Stadium on Sunday.

Other players on one knee during the performance included Ravens linebacker C.J. Mosley, wide receiver Mike Wallace and safety Lardarius Webb as well as Jaguars linebacker Dante Fowler, defensive tackle Calais Campbell, defensive end Yannick Ngakoue and cornerback Jalen Ramsey.

Players on both teams and Jaguars owner Shad Khan, who were not kneeling, remained locked arm-in-arm throughout the playing of the national anthem and “God Save The Queen,” the national anthem of Britain.

No players were kneeling during the playing of the British national anthem.

President Donald Trump had a suggestion on Saturday for National Football League owners whose players decide to take a knee during the national anthem: fire them.

— The Associated Press

BUFFALO BILLS

Statement from Buffalo Bills Owners Terry and Kim Pegula. pic.twitter.com/i3D5xzBBSn

— Buffalo Bills (@buffalobills) September 24, 2017

Love. Unity. Equality. #GoBills pic.twitter.com/tvlIqSc4tP

— Buffalo Bills (@buffalobills) September 24, 2017

CAROLINA PANTHERS

CHICAGO BEARS

CINCINNATI BENGALS

CLEVELAND BROWNS

Statement from Dee and Jimmy Haslam pic.twitter.com/QvCmKPkKwc

— Cleveland Browns (@Browns) September 24, 2017

DALLAS COWBOYS

DENVER BRONCOS

Vance Joseph addresses Trump comments during Broncos’ team meeting https://t.co/jTemURwGPr

— Nicki Jhabvala (@NickiJhabvala) September 24, 2017

DETROIT LIONS

GREEN BAY PACKERS

Posted on @AaronRodgers12‘s Instagram. Notice the response from Tom Brady pic.twitter.com/aRK6ddZmuv

— Nicki Jhabvala (@NickiJhabvala) September 24, 2017

HOUSTON TEXANS

INDIANAPOLIS COLTS

JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS

9:15 a.m.

Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shad Khan calls it a privilege to stand arm-in-arm with players during the national anthem in London.

Khan stood between tight end Marcedes Lewis and linebacker Telvin Smith at Wembley Stadium and then released a statement to express his support for players. Coaches and other team personnel from both teams did the same before the game against the Ravens.

About two dozen players on both teams kneeled, something President Donald Trump has said owners should fire players for.

“It was a privilege to stand on the sidelines with the Jacksonville Jaguars today for the playing of the U.S. national anthem at Wembley Stadium,” Khan said. “I met with our team captains prior to the game to express my support for them, all NFL players and the league following the divisive and contentious remarks made by President Trump, and was honored to be arm in arm with them, their teammates and our coaches during our anthem.”

— The Associated Press

Unity pic.twitter.com/wSNsc4BSEV

— Jacksonville Jaguars (@Jaguars) September 24, 2017

Statement from our Owner Shad Khan: pic.twitter.com/bbAJKpqZ3w

— Jacksonville Jaguars (@Jaguars) September 24, 2017

KANSAS CITY CHIEFS

LOS ANGELES CHARGERS

LOS ANGELES RAMS

Statement from Rams Owner/Chairman E. Stanley Kroenke. pic.twitter.com/OJ3vFbPNwn

— Los Angeles Rams (@RamsNFL) September 24, 2017

MIAMI DOLPHINS
A handful of Miami Dolphins players are wearing black T-shirts supporting free agent quarterback Colin Kaepernick during pregame warm-ups.

The shirts have “#IMWITHKAP” written in bold white lettering on the front.

Kaepernick was the first athlete to refuse to stand during the national anthem as a protest. This season, no team has signed him, and some supporters believe NFL owners are avoiding him because of the controversy.

Among the players sporting the shirts before their game against the New York Jets are wide receiver Kenny Stills, running back Jay Ajayi and offensive linemen Laremy Tunsil and Ja’Wuan James. Stills, also a team captain, posted a photo on Twitter of himself wearing the shirt, along with the post: “In case you didn’t know!”

— AP Sports Writer Dennis Waszak reporting from East Rutherford, New Jersey

Several Miami Dolphins players are wearing black, “IMWITHKAP” T-shirt on the field for warmups today. pic.twitter.com/jLvp3rqWYu

— James Walker (@JamesWalkerNFL) September 24, 2017

#Dolphins CB Byron Maxwell is among the first players on the field for warmups. Miami’s secondary must cover better, including Maxwell. pic.twitter.com/SUXL6YWrlL

— James Walker (@JamesWalkerNFL) September 24, 2017

MINNESOTA VIKINGS

#Vikings CB Xavier Rhodes just told me they are planning to interlock arms during the anthem.

— Josina Anderson (@JosinaAnderson) September 24, 2017

MINNEAPOLIS — With NFL owners and players around the league condemning President Donald Trump’s recent remarks about national anthem protests, the Minnesota Vikings have put forth their own show of unity.

The Vikings stood along their sideline with arms locked together during the “Star Spangled Banner” on Sunday before their game against Tampa Bay. Vikings owners Zygi and Mark Wilf and general manager Rick Spielman joined players in locking arms on the field.

No Minnesota players were spotted taking a knee, as Buccaneers wide receivers Mike Evans and DeSean Jackson did in front of the visiting bench and several others have done around the league since Colin Kaepernick started the trend last season.

The Wilfs said they support the right of Vikings players, coaches and staff to “respectfully and peacefully express their beliefs.”

— The Associated Press

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS

Statement from #Patriots Chairman & CEO Robert Kraft: pic.twitter.com/f5DJeK0Woj

— New England Patriots (@Patriots) September 24, 2017

NEW ORLEANS SAINTS

Pelicans statement pic.twitter.com/kRBBtJaBiI

— New Orleans Pelicans (@PelicansNBA) September 24, 2017

NEW YORK GIANTS

NEW YORK JETS

OAKLAND RAIDERS

PHILADELPHIA EAGLES

PITTSBURGH STEELERS

Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin reveals to @JamieErdahl that the team will not be participating in today’s national anthem. pic.twitter.com/5zihPWQsMv

— NFLonCBS (@NFLonCBS) September 24, 2017

10:12 a.m.
The Pittsburgh Steelers have decided to stay in their locker room for the national anthem before their game against the Chicago Bears, coach Mike Tomlin has told CBS.

The move was apparently in reaction to President Donald Trump’s suggestion that NFL owners fire players who kneel for the national anthem.

Several players from the Jaguars and Ravens decided to kneel in the first NFL game of the day in London. Then Tomlin said his players would not be on the sideline at Soldier Field in Chicago for the anthem.

— AP Sports Writer Jay Cohen reported from Chicago

LT Al Villanueva served 3 tours in Afghanistan, is a Bronze Star recipient and @WestPoint_USMA grad. No way this happens w/out his blessing. https://t.co/DctUHHrZC3

— Aditi Kinkhabwala (@AKinkhabwala) September 24, 2017

SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS

SEATTLE SEAHAWKS

TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS

TENNESSEE TITANS

Titans WR @_RMatthews to wear ‘We are one’ cleats, expressing stance against racial inequality and promoting unity:https://t.co/jNRSkKzp8S

— Cameron Wolfe (@CameronWolfe) September 24, 2017

WASHINGTON REDSKINS

NFL

Inside these lines, we can bring out the best in each other and live united. pic.twitter.com/nQpUrKFL4T

— NFL (@NFL) September 24, 2017

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Broncos vs. Bills live blog: Real-time updates from Week 3 action

September 24, 2017 - 9:04am

Live updates, tweets, photos, analysis and more from the Broncos game against the Buffalo Bills at New Era Field in Orchard Park, N.Y., on Sept. 24, 2017. Mobile users, if you don’t see the live blog, tap here.

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Siemian: 15-of-22, 154 yds, 0 TD, 0 INT, 2 scks, 88.1 rtgHauschka w 55-yard FG.. Ties score at 13 w 1 second left in half. 5 play, 38-yard drive in 41 seconds.. #DENvsBUF Buffalo hits FG
#Broncos 13, Bills 13

#DENvsBUF live blog: dpo.st/2hsgeRl https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgnHDbWkAA-OpS.jpgHave a better chance of explaining Calculus in 140 characters than NFL catch rule. twitter.com/PatrickBWayne/…Pressure from Lawson wrecks play.. McManus back out for a FG... 13-10 Broncos after 9 play drive.. 42 seconds left. @DenverChannel McManus hits 35-yd FG
#Broncos 13, #Bills 10

#DENvsBUF live blog: dpo.st/2htgEGS https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgmAcJU8AA2tqB.jpgAll of Siemian's passing TDs this year have been in the red zone.. Big moment here in tie game. @DenverChannel Back shoulder throw is unstoppable when executed. CB running full speed. And even if stops, gets boxed out.WATCH: Jamaal Charles rumbles 12 yards for #Broncos touchdown against #Bills dpo.st/2wdR7rt
#DENvsBUF You're not gonna believe this, but players protested and fans stayed. https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgkr7uX0AEPY9X.jpgBroncos now going after Bills' weakness, which is their secondary#Broncos Emmanuel Sanders has been more open today than 7-Eleven... Just keep feeding him the ball @DenverChannel #Bills hit 49-yd FG
#Broncos 10, Bills 10

#DENvsBUF live blog: dpo.st/2xtOTpg https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgj9ZOXUAATfuk.jpgBills' Stephen Hauschka, beat out by Matt Prater in Broncos' 2010 camp, hits 49-yard FG. It's now 10-10 with 2:51 left in half. #9sports #Bills tie score at 10-all on 49-yard FG... 2:51 left in half.... Penalty on first punt cost #Broncos 3 points. @DenverChannel Formation cost Broncos 37 yards of field position.#Broncos surrender huge chunk of field possession... Dixon makes tackle on punt.. Bills on 32 after 17-yard return. 37-yd differenceJamal Carter not on line of scrimmage.Dumb penalties.. Man... great coverage lost... Virgil Green had monster hit on the punt coverage.. Punt again.Cody Latimer with a tremendous coverage play on that long Riley Dixon punt. Coming back on formation penalty. #9sports Bills challenged and won. broncos puntingI believe Sanders had possession and then fumbled.. But players acting like will be reversed.. No catch..Blown coverage. Siemian connects with Sanders on a 44-yard completion. . Bills challenging the reception. @DenverChannel Siemian goes deep. Finds Emmanuel Sanders. 44 yards.Here's how to watch today's #Broncos ' game live online: dpo.st/2fKCFRQ by @gadgetress #DENvsBUF The Lions are just setting this up for another Stafford comeback, right?RB @jcharles25 with his 65th career overall touchdown (1st in DEN), tying for the 7th-most by an NFL RB since he entered the league in 2008.#Broncos 3 play, 79-yard drive. Helped by silly penalties and a 32-yard burst by @cjandersonb22 10-7 Denver...#Broncos rush to congratulate Jamaal Charles on his first TD as a Bronco. @DenverChannel Denver leads 10-7 w 10:26 left in half https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgeQwqU8AAnRHc.jpgJamaal Charles rumbles in for the score
#Broncos 10, #Bills 7

#DENvsBUF live blog: dpo.st/2fq9ypE https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgeR14XUAImkdh.jpgJamaal Charles' first touchdown as a Bronco.Jamaal Charles with his first Broncos TDBack to back 15-yard penalties on Bills. Roughing passer on Jerry Hughes.. Broncos on 12-yard line.32-yard run was the fifth-longest of RB @cjandersonb22 's career. Additional 15 yards gained on unnecessary roughness call.#Broncos threatening... Stupid penalty by Micah Hyde... 32-yard run by CJ and 15 on penalty @DenverChannel CJ Anderson with long burst,... And a late hit..#Bills take lead 7-3 on 10-play, 74-yard drive.. Two 28-yard completions fueled drive. @DenverChannel Taylor to Holmes
#Bills 7, #Broncos 3

#DENvsBUF live blog: dpo.st/2wLLZ24 https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgc00CV4AAFGaC.jpgTD, anyway, on fortunate pass deflection to Andre Holmes. 7-3 Bills, 11:41 left in first half.Mike Tolbert with wide open drop for TD. Third and goal at 2.Two, 28-yard completions by Tyrod Taylor has set up first and goal at 2. First crack, no gain. #9sports Broncos came into the game with No. 1 rushing attack in league, but in first quarter three of Broncos' eight... espn.com/espn/now?nowId…The Broncos lead after the 1st qtr. for the 3rd consecutive game. Last year, Denver only held a lead twice all season at the end of 1st qtr.The Broncos lead after the 1st qtr. for the 3rd consecutive game. Last year, Denver only held a lead twice all season at the end of 1st qtr.Bills in first quarter: 0 first downs; 10 total yards. Denver D dominating Rico Ball. But only up 3-0. #9sports Roughly half the Broncos players kneel during National Anthem 9news.com/sports/nfl/den… via @9NEWS #9sports Given 32 Broncos players took a knee during the national anthem today, here is team president/CEO Joe Ellis'... espn.com/espn/now?nowId…Brandon McManus hits the 38-yd FG
#Broncos 3, #Bills 0

#DENvsBUF live blog: dpo.st/2wKZS0B https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgaHmSVAAAfb8T.jpgBrandon McManus hits the 38-yd FG
#Broncos 3, #Bills 0

#DENvsBUF live blog: dpo.st/2wKZS0B https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgaHmSVAAAfb8T.jpgI need a bigger TV and some Adderall to watch 8 games at once.12 plays, 53 yards on FG drive. Big plays were Bennie Fowler catch and Bills PI penalty on third and long. #9sports K @thekidmcmanus has now made 80-of-96 (83.3%) career field goal attempts as a Bronco. That's the best percentage in team history.Brandon McManus attempting 38 yard FG. Good. 3-0 Broncos. 49 seconds left in 1st QTR. #9sports #Broncos McManus 38 FG attempt. IT's good. #Broncos lead 3-0 w 49 seconds left in first period. @DenverChannel Interference on DT extends #Broncos drive.Great catch by Bennie Fowler winning contested one-on-one battle for thrown pass. 19 yard gain. #9sports Fantastic one-hand grab by Fowler for first down.. 19-yard completion.Photos of Broncos players kneeling during the anthem. Rookie LT Garett Bolles his hand on Von Miller's shoulder. (pics by @Presto89 ) https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgVxvaWAAYCNie.jpg">https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgVw1QW4AAD7Uy.jpg">https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgVvvgXUAI7-WY.jpgPhotos of Broncos players kneeling during the anthem. Rookie LT Garett Bolles his hand on Von Miller's shoulder. (pics by @Presto89 ) https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgVxvaWAAYCNie.jpg">https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgVw1QW4AAD7Uy.jpg">https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgVvvgXUAI7-WY.jpgPhotos of Broncos players kneeling during the anthem. Rookie LT Garett Bolles his hand on Von Miller's shoulder. (pics by @Presto89 ) https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgVxvaWAAYCNie.jpg">https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgVw1QW4AAD7Uy.jpg">https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgVvvgXUAI7-WY.jpgVon Miller among dozens of #Broncos players who kneeled for national anthem dpo.st/2fqkS5m
by @NickiJhabvala https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DKgVgUTWAAEtaTQ.jpgSecond penalty on #Broncos offense. Jano, now Barbre . Could push them out of FG rangeSiemian finds Sanders for 29-yard gain.Von Miller among dozens of Broncos players who kneeled for national anthem dpo.st/2fpSO1M#Broncos Jamaal Charles gets to the corner for first down. @DenverChannel Von Miller among dozens of Broncos players who kneeled for national anthem dpo.st/2fpSO1MBroncos LB @vonmiller with his 83rd career sack, including playoffs. No NFL player has more since he entered the league in 2011.Broncos LB @vonmiller with his 83rd career sack, including playoffs. No NFL player has more since he entered the league in 2011.#Broncos D answers with three-and-out, including @VonMiller 's third sack in two games. @DenverChannel Von Miller now two sacks away from tying Karl Mecklenburg (79.5) for second place on Broncos' all-time list.#Broncos Von Miller with sack.. His third of season. @DenverChannel Von Miller with the sack of Tyrod Taylor#Broncos entered game 17-30 on third down.. But didn't face many third-and-11s... Broncos to punt. @DenverChannel Bolles, as expected, starting at left tackle @DenverChannel Related Articles
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Broncos’ Garett Bolles, Bennie Fowler active vs. Buffalo Bills

September 24, 2017 - 8:53am

ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. — Garett Bolles is back.

A week after suffering a lower-leg bruise and being carted off the field, the Broncos’ rookie left tackle is active against the Buffalo Bills on Sunday. As is receiver Bennie Fowler, who suffered a concussion and was cleared from the protocol Sunday evening.

Bolles did not attend practice last Wednesday, but returned on a limited basis Thursday and was initially listed as questionable to play in Sunday’s game.

The Broncos’ seven inactives are running back Devontae Booker, who is still working his way back from wrist surgery; veteran defensive lineman and recent free-agent signing Ahtyba Rubin; quarterback Paxton Lynch (shoulder); cornerback Brendan Langley (knee); receiver Jordan Taylor, offensive lineman Billy Turner and defensive lineman Kyle Peko.

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Von Miller among Broncos players who kneeled for national anthem; Vance Joseph addresses Trump’s comments

September 24, 2017 - 8:18am

ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. — Thirty-two Broncos players were kneeling during the national anthem Sunday ahead of their game against the Buffalo Bills. Star outside linebacker Von Miller was among them, along with the majority of the defense and players on the practice squad.

Kicker Brandon McManus had his hand on the shoulder of guard Max Garcia, who kneeled. And outside linebacker Shaquil Barrett and tight end Virgil Green stood with their fists raised in the air.

Head coach Vance Joseph and offensive coordinator Mike McCoy stood for the anthem.

Joseph broached the subject directly and succinctly during the team’s Saturday night meeting. He told his players he supported them. He encouraged them to stick together and emphasized a focus on the game ahead, against the Buffalo Bills. However they wished to address the matter after the game, he would have their backs.

In the near-36 hours since President Donald Trump called on NFL owners to fire “son of a bitch” national anthem protesters, then doubled down on his stance via social media, NFL executives, owners, coaches and players responded with strong comments in support of their game and their athletes.

Broncos president/CEO Joe Ellis issued a statement to reiterate the team’s support of its players and “admiration for their dedication to making our team the absolute best it can be.” He didn’t name Trump, nor did he mention the president’s comments. General manager John Elway also spoke to Joseph and has been involved in the team’s discussions and handling of the matter internally.

Many other teams convened Saturday evening to decide what they would do before their games Sunday, be it a protest or show of unity or nothing at all. Before the Jacksonville’s game against the Ravens in London, Jaguars owner Shadid Khan, who donated $1 million to Trump’s presidential campaign, stood with his arms locked with tight end Marcedes Lewis and linebacker Telvin Smith. Dozens of players from both teams kneeled during the anthem.

“I met with our team captains prior to the game to express my support for them, all NFL players and the league following the divisive and contentious remarks made by President Trump, and was honored to be arm in arm with them, our teammates and our coaches during our anthem,” Khan told reporters after the game. “Our team and the National Football league reflects our nation, with diversity coming in many forms — race, faith, our views and our goals. We have a lot of work to do, and we can do it, but the comments by the president make it harder. That’s why it was important for us, and personally for me, to show the world that even if we may differ at times, we can and should be united in the effort to become better as people and a nation.”

Over the past year, as many have taken Colin Kaepernick’s lead and kneeled for the national anthem in protest of social injustice and police brutality, not all players across NFL locker rooms have agreed with the protests.

Broncos defensive end Derek Wolfe was among those who stood for the anthem Sunday. He made it clear he believes in standing out of respect for service men and women. But he’s also offered his support of his teammates who have decided to protest. Inside linebacker Brandon Marshall kneeled for seven games last season and lost a pair of endorsement deals and received numerous hate-filled and threatening messages from fans. Marshall kneeled Sunday.

“Him getting hate mail like that, that’s also disgusting,” Wolfe told The Post. “Why do you want to take a step back as a human race? We’re all the same. We’re all human beings. It’s OK to be different.”

In a statement to ESPN’s Josina Anderson on Sunday morning, Wolfe said: “I stand because I respect the men who died in real battle so I have the freedom to battle on the field. Paying tribute to the men and women who have given their lives for our freedom is why I stand. But everyone these days likes to find a reason to protest and that’s their right. It’s America and you are free to speak your mind. I just feel it’s disrespectful to the ones who sacrificed their lives and it’s maybe the wrong platform. But like I said to each their own it’s AMERICA! The greatest country in the world and if you don’t think we are the greatest country in the world and you reside here, then why do you stay? A lot worse places in the world to call home. Proud to be an American.”

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NFL owners speak out in support of players, against Trump

September 24, 2017 - 7:47am

The NFL’s players and owners have united in a manner unseen in years in the nation’s most popular professional sports league, sounding a resolute chord in decrying President Donald Trump’s remarks about players kneeling during the national anthem.

New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, who’s been a strong supporter of the president, expressed “deep disappointment” with Trump on Sunday and said politicians could learn much from the unifying spirit of a competitive enterprise like professional football that succeeds from teamwork.

“I am deeply disappointed by the tone of the comments made by the President …,” Kraft said in a statement. “Our players are intelligent, thoughtful, and care deeply about our community and I support their right to peacefully affect social change and raise awareness in a manner that they feel is most impactful.”

Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin reveals to @JamieErdahl that the team will not be participating in today’s national anthem. pic.twitter.com/5zihPWQsMv

— NFLonCBS (@NFLonCBS) September 24, 2017

Quarterback Colin Kaepernick started the movement last year when he played for the San Francisco 49ers, refusing to stand during “The Star-Spangled Banner” to protest the treatment of black people by police. Kaepernick became a free agent and has not been signed by a new team for this season.

Without naming Kaepernick, Trump aimed a Friday talk at a Huntsville, Alabama, rally at those players who have knelt for the anthem.

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“Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, you’d say, ‘Get that son of a bitch off the field right now. Out! He’s fired,'” he said to loud applause.

Again in a Sunday morning tweet, Trump urged his supporters to take action: “If NFL fans refuse to go to games until players stop disrespecting our Flag & Country, you will see change take place fast. Fire or suspend!”

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin followed up Sunday on ABC’s “This Week” defending Trump, saying the NFL has many rules governing what players can and cannot do.

“I think what the president is saying is that the owners should have a rule that players should have to stand in respect for the national anthem,” Mnuchin said. “They can do free speech on their own time.”

Trump’s remarks provoked team owners and the NFL to stridently defend the sport and its players.

If NFL fans refuse to go to games until players stop disrespecting our Flag & Country, you will see change take place fast. Fire or suspend!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 24, 2017

…NFL attendance and ratings are WAY DOWN. Boring games yes, but many stay away because they love our country. League should back U.S.

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 24, 2017

The Buffalo Bills were bothered enough by the situation to hold a voluntary team meeting on Saturday, with players, coaches, staff and ownership all taking part.

“Our goal was to provide open dialogue and communication. We listened to one another. We believe it’s the best way to work through any issue we are facing, on and off the field,” owners Terry and Kim Pegula said in a statement distributed by the Bills . “President Trump’s remarks were divisive and disrespectful to the entire NFL community, but we tried to use them as an opportunity to further unify our team and our organization. Our players have the freedom to express themselves in a respectful and thoughtful manner and we all agreed that our sole message is to provide and to promote an environment that is focused on love and equality.”

Commissioner Roger Goodell, who has taken heat for Kaepernick’s struggle to find a team, quickly condemned Trump’s comments.

“The NFL and our players are at our best when we help create a sense of unity in our country and our culture. There is no better example than the amazing response from our clubs and players to the terrible natural disasters we’ve experienced over the last month,” Goodell said. “Divisive comments like these demonstrate an unfortunate lack of respect for the NFL, our great game and all of our players, and a failure to understand the overwhelming force for good our clubs and players represent in our communities.”

At least seven team owners donated $1 million each to Trump’s inaugural committee. But Los Angeles Chargers owner Dean Spanos , Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank , New York Giants owners John Mara and Steve Tisch, Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross, Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay, Tennessee Titans’ controlling owner Amy Adams Strunk and San Francisco 49ers owner Jed York were among the league power-brokers who issued condemning statements through their clubs.

“The callous and offensive comments made by the president are contradictory to what this great country stands for,” York said. “Our players have exercised their rights as United States citizens in order to spark conversation and action to address social injustice. We will continue to support them in their peaceful pursuit of positive change in our country and around the world.”

Added Green Bay Packers President and CEO Mark Murphy: “We believe it is important to support any of our players who choose to peacefully express themselves with the hope of change for good. As Americans, we are fortunate to be able to speak openly and freely.”

This weekend’s games were sure to bring more protests, with Tampa Bay receiver Desean Jackson promising to make “a statement.”

“I know our players who kneeled for the anthem, and these are smart young men of character who want to make our world a better place for everyone,” Ross said. “They wanted to start a conversation and are making a difference in our community, including working with law enforcement to bring people together. We all can benefit from learning, listening and respecting each other.”

___

AP Sports Writer John Wawrow in Buffalo, New York, contributed to this report.

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Feds arrest two Missouri men accused of stealing guns from southeast Colorado gun store, selling them in St. Louis

September 24, 2017 - 7:15am

Federal authorities have arrested two Missouri men accused of stealing 19 firearms — including five rifles — from a gun store in southeast Colorado last month before selling most of them in St. Louis.

Calvin Terrell Stafford and Napoleon Williams, both 23, were ordered held without bail by a federal judge Friday, Colorado’s U.S. attorney’s office said.

Prosecutors allege that on Aug. 10 the pair traveled to Springfield, Colo., intending to buy marijuana to sell in Missouri.

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“When the marijuana deal fell, through, they decided to steal firearms from a local gun shop,” the U.S. attorney’s office said. “They stole 19 guns, including five rifles, from Best Way Sales in Springfield. After the burglary, the defendants drove the stolen firearms out of Colorado to St. Louis … where they sold most of the stolen guns.”

Stafford and Williams face a sentence in federal prison — and thousands of dollars in fines — if convicted.

The Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco Firearms and Explosives worked with the Baca County Sheriff’s Office and Springfield Police Department on the case.

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Dreary weather sticking around Denver into start of the week

September 24, 2017 - 6:50am

The cool, dreary weather is sticking around Denver on Sunday and is expected to continue into Monday as the city kicks off fall.

The National Weather Service in Boulder is calling for a high near 53 degrees with a 50 percent chance of rain on Sunday. Temperatures in Denver are set to drop into the 40s at night with a 60 percent chance of rain and light winds.

On Monday, the high is set to top out near 54 degrees with a 20 percent chance of rain showers.

Tuesday and Wednesday are expected to be mostly sunny and warmer.

Today. pic.twitter.com/5HxzQ6qwJP

— Aspen Snowmass (@AspenSnowmass) September 24, 2017

Snow hit Colorado’s mountains on Saturday, where the road to Mount Evans was closed for the season because of the wintry weather and ski areas were rejoicing.

Some high country areas were expected to get as much 5 inches of snow before the weather system moves out.

Thanks for the brief visit Fall. Winter is already moving on in.#winterparkresort #firstsnow #winteriscoming pic.twitter.com/vDgKKbvS4Y

— Winter Park Resort (@WinterPark) September 23, 2017

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Ask Amy: Sister wonders about forcing confession

September 24, 2017 - 3:30am

Dear Amy: After more than 20 years of marriage, my husband and I divorced. During the marriage, my husband had a brief sexual affair with my sister. I did not find out until several years after the event. My husband confessed to the incident because he was feeling guilty. He confessed to other incidents, and after much counseling, we divorced.

I have given my sister every opportunity to fess up and apologize. I wanted to forgive her and for us to move on. She refused to acknowledge any role in this and I finally quit speaking to her several years ago.

She has a history of deceitful behavior, refuses to accept any responsibility for her misdeeds, and has always felt entitled. She is the youngest and our parents didn’t do her any favors by not forcing her to have responsibilities like the rest. They enabled her behavior.

Now, my sister has medical problems and financial hardships. I am the only family member in a position to help.

No one has asked me to help, and I have not offered, but I want to help her. If I do, am I giving up my right to an apology and a request for forgiveness?

I don’t want to blackmail her into a confession and apology, but that is probably the only way I will ever get it, and it won’t be sincere because she isn’t really apologetic.

What do you think I should do?

— Deceived Sister

Dear Deceived: If you want to help your sister, you should do so. After all of this time, you should accept the fact that your sister will likely not admit to any wrongdoing, will not apologize, and will not ask for forgiveness. You are right about a “forced confession.” So, can you carry on and help her without attaching conditions?

If you choose to help your sister, you should do it out of compassion and without any expectation for her to behave in any particular way.

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Forgiveness isn’t necessary for you to do what you want to do. However, if you can find your way toward forgiveness (regardless of her denials and behavior), you will find yourself liberated from this betrayal.

Dear Amy: I have been with my husband for five years.

His friends from high school make up his main group of friends. Some have married (or are dating) inside the group, and some have married outside. The girls in the group are a VERY cliquey bunch.

Every so often we “outsider” girls have to hear about girls’ nights that they had to which we were not invited.

One of the girls inside the group was the first to get married, and didn’t invite the outside girls to her bachelorette party.

I’ll admit I also didn’t invite these cliquey girls to my bachelorette party. I came to the conclusion that since they didn’t invite me, I didn’t invite them. It wasn’t out of spite.

When any of the guys have had their bachelor parties, the outsider guys get invited.

I want to get along with the girls, but they are not welcoming at all, even though I’ve been with my husband for a long time. My husband also gets upset by this, but doesn’t say much.

They will also take and post photos of them together, leaving us out of the photos, even though we are in the same room. This is upsetting to the outsider girls. Do we have the right to be upset? Should we say something?

— Upset Outsider

Dear Upset: First of all, while it is definitely not pleasant to be excluded within a larger group of friends, I have to wonder why you would want to be included within this noxious “girl” group.

You had an opportunity to behave in a way that would model pro-social and inclusive behavior when you held your own bachelorette party and chose not to invite them. At this point, you could express yourself like a grown-up: “Hey, your exclusive behavior bothers me. Can we find ways to come closer together?”

All of you should behave more like grown women, and less like “girls.”

Dear Amy: “Want to Make it Right” wanted to reach out to someone that the writer thought he had bullied in high school. Thank you for responding: “It is never a mistake, and never too late, to make amends.”

That quote made it onto my refrigerator.

— Avid Reader

Dear Reader: Thank you. I feel honored!

Here’s what’s on my fridge: “It’s never a mistake, and never too late, to make carbonara.”



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Next month, Colorado hosts the future of the oldest dance company in America

September 23, 2017 - 11:36pm

If you’re the oldest dance company in America, with a repertoire of iconic dances, how do you keep it fresh — especially if you are a modern-dance company?

“Modern dance is all about revolt,” said Janet Eilber, the artistic director of the Martha Graham Dance Company. “We have a body of classics. But going into the 21st century, we needed to figure out the future.”

That future — which entails doing justice to Graham’s 181 dances and commissioning works from a wide range of new choreographers — will be on display in October in performances in Fort Collins, Boulder and Denver.

Eilber’s path has not been without controversy, as some critics have voiced unhappiness with the new dances and the execution of the old ones.

“It has been interesting,” Eilber, who danced with the company in the 1970s and became artistic director in 2005, said diplomatically. “But I can’t imagining doing it any other way. We are in a deep conservation with today’s artists … to bring fresh eyes to the Graham legacy.”

And quite a legacy it is.

Modern dance in many ways began with Martha Graham in 1926. While there were earlier pioneers — Isadora Duncan and Ruth St. Denis — Graham created a dancing technique that has been called the “cornerstone of modern dance.”

For decades, Graham plumbed Greek mythology, American traditions, native ritual, and themes of love and sex. Graham performed until she was 76 and continued to choreograph until her death in 1991 at the age of 96.

And then, as if descending into its own Greek drama, the company passed through a series of trials. It skirted bankruptcy, postponed seasons, and had to go to court to keep the rights to Graham’s choreography. Finally, the company’s basement storeroom was flooded in 2012 during Hurricane Sandy, destroying sets and costumes. But that is now all in the rearview mirror.

“We are very happy now to have the same problems every non-profit has, because we were a special case for about 20 years,” Eilber said.

It was the threat of bankruptcy that really forced a hard look at the company and its future.

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“Martha herself was all about the future, all about what would engage, shock, entreat the audience of today, whenever today was,” Eilber said.

The company is commissioning works from a wide range of dance-makers, from Lar Lubovitch, one of the most established choreographers of modern and ballet works, to Charles “Lil Buck” Riley, a virtuoso of the Memphis street dance called Jookin.

“When we commission, we don’t want Graham-lite,” Eilber said. Graham constructed her dances on a technique that focused on the core, on contraction and release. Many of the new choreographers are asking completely different things of the company’s 15 full-time dancers.

“They are becoming more facile, moving from one style to another,” Eilber said.

The Graham company’s blend of old and new, in this season’s theme of “sacred and profane,” will be danced at University of Colorado Boulder’s Macky Auditorium, the Newman Center at the University of Denver, and at the Lincoln Center in Fort Collins.

On the sacred side of the bill is “Dark Meadow Suite,” a selection of dances from Graham’s 1946 “Dark Meadows,” a work inspired by the rituals of Native Americans of the Southwest and Mexico, set to music by Mexican composer Carlos Ch–vez.

The Belgian choreographer Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui offers a contemporary take on the sacred. “Cherkaoui is associated with more spiritual works,” Eilber said. He has even collaborated with Chinese Shaolin monks. In “Mosaic,” Cherkaoui explores the world of Middle Eastern culture to a score by Felix Buxton, which also evokes the music of the region.

“Errand into the Maze,” a 1947 work choreographed and first danced by Graham, is part of the performance’s profane. It is loosely based on the Greek myth of Theseus, who must navigate a labyrinth to defeat the Minotaur, a half-man and half-beast.

The focal point of the dance, however, is Ariadne, the princess who is crucial to defeating the monster. “It is a story of a woman conquering her own fears,” Eilber said.

The music is by Gian Carlo Menotti, and the original sets were designed by Isamu Noguchi. Both the sets and costumes were victims of Hurricane Sandy. The company received a grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to restore and replace sets and costumes, but this production is a stripped-down version.

The modern side of the profane is a piece by the Swedish choreographer, Pontus Lidberg, titled “Woodlands.” In the music by Irving Fine, Lidberg said he heard the imagery of woodland, moonlight and wandering creatures.

“It is dance where young men and women interact in a landscape,” Eilber said. “Maybe it is a woodland, or a woodland of the mind.”

—–

The Martha Graham Dance Company will be performing at:

Lincoln Center, 417 W. Magnolia St., Fort Collins, Oct. 3 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased here.

Macky Auditorium, the University of Colorado Boulder, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, Oct. 5 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased here.

Newman Center, University of Denver, 2344 East Iliff Ave., Denver, Oct. 7 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased here.

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Growing pains hit Steven Montez hard in Colorado Buffaloes’ loss to Washington

September 23, 2017 - 11:35pm

BOULDER – All Myles Bryant had to do was watch Steven Montez’s eyes.

The University of Colorado faced third-and-4 from its own 30-yard line. Montez stood in the shotgun with a five-wide receiver set – three to the far side, two to the near. He’d been pressured often Saturday night by the Washington defense, sacked twice to that point and continuously flushed from the pocket. But after showing blitz with two linebackers, the Huskies rushed only three on the play.

Montez took the snap and within 1.8 seconds, the ball was out of his hands. The problem? Out of five available targets, Montez, a redshirt sophomore, never glanced off wide receiver Bryce Bobo, paying no attention to Bryant, Washington’s defensive back, who sat in his zone, jumped the route and returned the interception 35 yards for a touchdown. The play put the seventh-ranked Huskies up 24-10 with 2 minutes, 3 seconds remaining in the third quarter, and effectively out of reach.

It was that kind of night for Montez. He has the physical tools to be an elite Pac-12 quarterback, but showed he still has a way to go before he gets there.

“I saw the corner, he was pressed, and then bailed. We had an under-call, which is like a five-yard in-route, so I was thinking, ‘the corner bailed, we should have it,’” Montez, who has seven career starts, said of his final interception of the night. “When I released the ball, I saw what I want to say was the nickel buzz right under it … bad decision.”

He whispered again: “Extremely bad decision.”

Montez completed 21 of 27 passes for 171 yards and a trio of interceptions in the Buffs’ 37-10 loss to Washington at Folsom Field. He was sacked four times. Two of his pass attempts were dropped, another went off the fingertips of running back Phillip Lindsay, landing in the lap of Washington’s Jordan Miller – his first of two picks Saturday.

It’s hard to win when you throw three interceptions in a game, Montez said, adding the light rain and cold temperatures didn’t affect his play. But his mental lapses weren’t limited to his throws. He also misjudged a down-and-distance situation in the second quarter, costing the Buffs a first down — and worse.

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With a reputation of toughness and a willingness to grind for an extra yard like a running back rather than slide, Montez protected himself on a third-and-3 play in the second quarter. Instead of diving or waiting another half-second longer to slide, Montez gave himself up after a two-yard run with green grass in front of him, leading to fourth-and-inches from the Buffs’ 29. The next play, CU punter Alex Kinney had his kick blocked. Washington (4-0, 1-0 Pac-12) recovered the ball on the 12 and scored a touchdown on the ensuing possession to tie the game at 7-7, erasing CU’s only lead of the night.

“I was just trying to play football. That’s really all I was doing. On that third down, I just got to know down and distance. I got to know that I got to put my head down and run them over, or try to make him miss or do something to get that first down. I definitely can’t slide on (third-and-3) and come up short.”

The 171 passing yards Montez threw for Saturday were the fewest of any of his career starts, and the three interceptions were his most. It was also the first game he’s started that he hasn’t thrown a touchdown.

Improved decision making will come with experience, but opening the Pac-12 schedule with a loss and heading to Los Angeles to face Josh Rosen and UCLA next week, Montez will have to grow up quickly. The Buffs (3-1, 0-1) hope Saturday’s defeat will be a learning experience for their quarterback, and if nothing else, CU coach Mike MacIntyre wants Montez to take away one thing from this loss.

“I hope he takes away not throwing to the wrong colored jerseys,” MacIntyre snarked. “It’s what I hope.”

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StoryCorps’ Thanksgiving Listen asks kids to record elders

September 23, 2017 - 11:02pm

StoryCorps is hoping people give their social media apps a break for a few minutes this Thanksgiving and instead use one designed for listening.

The nonprofit oral history project on Thursday announced the 2017 edition of its Great Thanksgiving Listen, which calls for high school students to record a conversation with an elder over the holiday weekend using the StoryCorps app.

Students also can add photos and videos to their stories and upload them to an online StoryCorps archive. They’ll also be included in a StoryCorps collection at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress.

Dave Isay, StoryCorps’ founder and president, sees the event as a potential way “to strengthen our national fabric at a time when we desperately need it.”

“Listening is a skill critical to young people now and in their future,” Isay added.

This is the third year for the Great Thanksgiving Listen. Before 2015, those participating in StoryCorps had to visit the project’s mobile booth or its permanent booths located in New York, Chicago, Atlanta and San Francisco.

The app has been a boon to StoryCorps’ archive of American voices. The project had amassed more than 50,000 recordings by the time the app was launched in March 2015. Since then, the app has added nearly 250,000 new stories to the archive, including 75,000 recorded during its Great Thanksgiving Listen events.

The app was launched in part with a grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, which funds media innovation and has also provided funding for The Associated Press. The foundation on Thursday announced $600,000 in new funding for StoryCorps.

 

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Making a match: Avoid the common mistakes that employers and job seekers make

September 23, 2017 - 11:01pm

On the front lines of the talent acquisition industry, I witness the problems U.S. employers are having matching workers with open jobs. Even with unemployment in Denver well below national averages, employers here are slow to realize they have to adjust their expectations, either on their qualification requirements, or on the salary they have allocated to pay.

But there is more to the story. Much like modern-day dating, the hiring process is inherently flawed. On one side you have a bunch of companies that really want and need good people. On the other side you have a handful of great candidates who want and need a good job. The goal is to find mutual success, but the search gets inundated with coy hiring games, digitized ‘wingmen,’ feigned interest, missed connections or no follow-through.

Sound familiar?

Arming oneself with a more robust understanding of how talent acquisition works can allow both employer and employee to greatly improve their odds of finding one another. Here are some thoughts on how each side can fine-tune their current playbook, better navigate the process and find one another:

The Dump and Run – This is what we call it when candidates respond broadly to online job postings, without taking the time to read the job description and figure out if it’s something they want, or that they are even qualified for. As example, last week I was searching for a controller with a CPA in Denver. I received hundreds of unqualified resumes, including one from an electrician, a bookkeeper in West Virginia, a student in Ghana and a receptionist. I am not joking. I implore you job seekers — don’t do this. It’s obvious when you do, it floods the recruiter’s or hiring manager’s inbox with more resumes than they can possibly sift through and it sours the process on both sides. Employees don’t hear back and employers are irritated with the inept thoroughness of a prospective candidate.  And this starts a vicious cycle.

The Robots – Automated search programs take some of the screening work out of the HR equation. While these computerized programs filter for key words or certain qualifications, they are impersonal and throw out any resume that doesn’t match pre-programmed keywords. While this is a timesaver especially in large organizations, it also keeps companies from seeing applicants who could be the right fit, due to a miscalculated key phrase or word on a resume. It is also likely the robot was programmed with an unrealistic list of qualifications required, and no one can be all things to all people. While I am all about efficiency and recognize this is a fact of the business, computers simply cannot read between the lines. When searching for the right, best candidate, nothing can replace eyeballs and the human touch in the search process.

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The Ubiquitous Cover Letter – Different recruiters think differently about these, but I think we would all agree on the sentiment, which is you have to do the due diligence, tailor your approach and make the case about why you should be considered for each job you apply for. As mentioned above, most job openings receive dozens if not hundreds of resumes. Your resume and your cover letter are your marketing documents tailored to represent you. Don’t default to the job board resume or use a form cover letter if you want to get noticed from the pack — make yourself unique. And whether it’s a cover letter or a direct email to the hiring manager, let them know why it’s worth their time to talk to you about this specific job. Let your personality, and your interest, show through. I just interacted with a recent candidate who quipped in an email that he had to look up the word “aplomb,” which I used in a job description. He then proceeded to tell me how he definitely had ‘aplomb.’ He got an interview.

The Job Description – Invariably the first thing I do for a client is re-write their job description. This is a marketing document, folks! It is someone’s first perception of your organization. Don’t dig out an old version you’ve been using for 10 years and expect that it will entice the type of person you want today — especially in this low-unemployment, employee-driven market. Take the time to write something that effectively communicates who you are as a company, the specific type of person you’re looking for and what the hire will be doing. Really think about the title. Show some character and be creative.

The Follow-up – Just like after a first date, the tone can be set by the type and timing of the follow-up. Candidates – do it right away, and make it personal. Mention something you specifically liked about the company or the position. Companies – get back to people. Don’t string candidates along with no feedback. Be honest so people can move on, or move through the process and stay interested.

Categories: All Denver News.

There’s more to an entrepreneur than starting up. There’s also the exit.

September 23, 2017 - 11:01pm

As Denver Startup Week revs up for its Monday kickoff, there’s a growing number of local founders looking at entrepreneurship differently than in years past. They’ve been there, done that and have now reached the peak: They have sold their startups.

Some of the state’s largest companies found new owners in 2017, including satellite imagery firm Digital Globe, engineering giant CH2M and, by the end of the year, telecom behemoth Level 3 Communications. Dozens of homegrown ones have done the same, including video-tutorial site Craftsy, acquired by Comcast NBCUniversal; retailer eBags, snatched up by Samsonite; and data-center firm ViaWest, picked up by Peak 10.

Denver Startup Week

The week-long, downtown Denver event, which offers sessions aimed at entrepreneurs, has become one of the biggest events of its kind nationwide. This year, topics explore health, technology, cannabis, the internet of things and diversity.

But for many founders, “exiting,” a term popular in the startup world, was never the intention. And it shouldn’t be, said Dustin Nyhus, who with his wife, Kim, co-founded custom-home goods maker Deny Designs in 2011.

“I never ran the business to sell it. I ran the business to make a living and hopefully do something really interesting in the market. But never did I start it with the idea of selling it,” said Nyhus, who remains at Deny after selling to to the parent of a rival in May. “I don’t really agree with that approach because if it was, you would make different decisions.”

Founders who have recently sold their businesses shared their stories, with advice for all those curious about what happens after Day 1.

Daily Camera file photoIngrid Alongi cofounded Quick Left in Boulder in 2010. In 2016, she made the decision to sell the company to Cognizant, which she joined to serve as senior director for the mentor network of Cognizant Accelerator. Ingrid Alongi, Quick Left

Co-founded Quick Left in Boulder in 2010 to offer website and mobile development services after getting laid off from her software engineering job a year earlier at Gnip, which is now owned by Twitter. While pregnant with twins and facing a shifting business market, Alongi decided to sell the company in 2016 to Cognizant, a massive consulting firm that employs more than 250,000. She now serves as senior director for the mentor network of Cognizant Accelerator, a startup within the larger company.

On deciding to sell

“For me, my life situation was changing. I was about to have twins. There were also challenges in the market that I felt I wasn’t up to. You always want to sell before you’re in trouble. There was also a shift in the market and my own feelings of wanting to get out. I was starting to get a little burned out.”

A shift in the market?

“I’m still seeing companies suffer from it. But our prices were dropping and developer salaries were increasing. We would have to figure out how to solve that with either outsourcing or any number of things. We were starting to see a pattern of customers wanting to pick and choose who they wanted to work with and (pick) the senior people for their team but not pay full rates. The same year we got acquired, a few other shops closed, like Thoughtbot closed its Denver office, ModeSet closed.”

On timing

“Anytime you’re thinking of being acquired, you want to think of a few different things: Where would I want to go, where would my team want to go? Those are some of the discussions we had. I basically put it out to my personal and professional network that we were looking to sell and that’s how we got introduced to Cognizant. … If you’re looking to do this, you want to start nine months ahead of time. I takes six to nine months. I did a lot of talking while I was on maternity leave. And when I came back from maternity leave, everything had been finished and wrapped up. I came back to a new company. But it was kind of good, too. I had the chance to go through the mourning process, I suppose, in the privacy of my own home with something nice to focus on, my twins. When I came back to the office, I had a great attitude.”

On finding the right buyer

“(Cognizant) was not my first choice in companies to be acquired. I was cautiously optimistic based on the interactions I had. But the last company I expected to sell to was a giant company. The takeaway is to have an open mind as to what the potential can be. There was a company that had a better fit with us, they did things like us, had a culture just like ours. But the deal was so bad. There’s a tension you have as a founder. You do your best for your team, for yourself. But there’s a lot of things pulling you and sometimes you don’t have a lot of choices, like sometimes, there’s not a buyer. We were lucky.”

Advice to startups

“The startup community romanticizes acquisitions and exits. A lot of them are not that glamorous. Keep that in mind. Mine wasn’t that glamorous because I was a services company.”

What’s next?

“We get to do the cool startup stuff we always wanted to do before the acquisition but we couldn’t because of budgets. We’d have to take clients we didn’t really want because we had to meet payroll. I get to hire people because we need them on the team and I don’t have to worry that ‘Oh, I have to close another deal before we can hire.’ I just got through hiring 20 people in one shot.”

Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver PostCraftsy co-founder and CEO John Levisay of Craftsy on Monday, January 14, 2013. John Levisay, Craftsy

Co-founded Craftsy in 2010 with Todd Tobin, Bret Hanna and others. The Denver company produces video tutorials on cooking, sewing and all sorts of crafting topics. Craftsy was acquired in May by Comcast NBCUniversal for a reported $230 million.

On starting up

“When you start a company, there are really three potential outcomes. You build a company that stays private and becomes a kind of large private company or you go public or you sell the company. And we were always believers that all three of those outcomes are contingent on building a great company. So that was kind of always our focus. Find a need in the market, achieve a product market fit and delight customers. Build a loyal and avid customer base. That was our mantra and approach throughout the business.”

On deciding to exit

“We were not looking. We had not hired a banker. The business was not for sale. If you’d asked me a year ago where we would be in a year, this would not have been on my radar. I think that anytime you look at (a sale), you’ve got to evaluate that on a number of parameters. Is this what’s best for employees, what’s best for our investors and what’s best for our customers? When we began to have talks with NBCU, I was incredibly impressed with the people there, from an integrity perspective, a vision perspective and from a smarts perspective. The outcome was a good one for our investors and ultimately for the vision of the business and to grow the business.”

Advice to entrepreneurs

“We had this hypothesis that there was a market opportunity for quality content delivered in a new way. Once we began to get content in the market, we realized that some of the categories we thought people would want, they don’t necessarily want. But others, they definitely want. You can call it a pivot. You’ve got to listen to your customers no matter how early it is.”

What’s next?

“We (Levisay, Tobin and Hanna) have no intention of going anywhere. (NBCU) is expanding our reach and resources and bringing in new ways of thinking about things. It furthers our mission. This wasn’t like one of those situations where you see the founders selling a business and essentially immediately departing the business or signing an earn-out and just counting the days before you can leave. It’s just the opposite. All of us here are really excited about the future.”

DENVER, CO – SEPTEMBER 21: Jeremy Ostermiller, CEO of Edison Interactive, is working to puts video screens in ride-sharing vehicles on September 21, 2017 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by RJ Sangosti/The Denver Post) Jeremy Ostermiller, Altitude Digital

Started with $500 in 2009 to help publishers benefit from online advertising. The Denver firm moved into video ads and raised $22.5 million from investors. But with tough competition and a consolidating industry, Ostermiller stepped down in November but remained on the board. In August, the company merged with Genesis Media. Ostermiller is now CEO of Edison Interactive, the Denver firm behind an advertising software platform geared for taxis and ride-sharing services, such as Uber and Lyft. The company is testing in South Africa and has its technology in “1,000 Ubers in Europe.”

On raising money from investors

“We were a venture capital-backed technology company. Our investors, like all investors, have a return they need to hit. We had over 10 offers in a matter of 16 months, but we could never get our investors to get on the same page. We were getting offers for 6x, 7x and 8x and they wanted to hold out for a 10x return. I had a hard time with that. I’m not a greedy person. I wanted to do what was right for the company and the people. I wanted to take an offer on the table. They had other ideas.”

On leaving

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“As an entrepreneur, I’m kind of a rebel. I started the company because I didn’t want a job. It felt like a job probably two years after we took the VC funding. With VCs involved, they want you to be laser focused — and that can be a blessing and a curse. It felt like a job when I couldn’t continue to innovate and push the needle, when I was being told what to do and not being able to lead.”

Regrets?

“It’s okay to ask for help. One of my mistakes early on is I thought I knew it all. Ask for help if you need it.”

On what he learned

“The only thing constant is change. Being comfortable is the enemy. The way I look at this is if you’re not looking two years ahead, you’re two years behind. What I really learned is to trust your first instinct because it’s probably right. There were a lot of times I’d doubt myself, wait two to five months to fire someone. The first instance is when you should act. Performance is more important than loyalty.”

Advice to startups

“Focus on your MVP, the minimum viable product. I see all the startups trying to kill it on version one. Just get something out there to customers. See if it sticks. Your customers will tell you where to go. Don’t worry about the bells and whistles.”

Next up

“(Edison Interactive) was the perfect scenario for me, to not only continue in a CEO position, but offered a majority shareholder position in the company. But another piece was the technology was 12 years in the making. The (Edison technology) is on version 4. If I can tell entrepreneurs anything, it’s that building technology is probably the hardest thing you can do.”

RJ Sangosti, The Denver PostDeny Designs co-founders Dustin and Kim Nyhus are at their new headquarters in Englewood, December 01, 2016. Dustin Nyhus, Deny Designs

Started the on-demand home-products company in Denver with his wife, Kim, in 2011. The self-funded company worked with artists to print artwork and designs on shower curtains, bedding and, more recently, furniture. The Nyhuses sold the company to Leaf Group, which owns rival art site Society 6, in May for $12 million. The couple now work for Leaf Group.

On deciding to sell the company

“We didn’t use banks, we didn’t use funding, we didn’t use anything. We just used our own money. We came to the decision (to sell) from a manufacturing standpoint and mainly that we were going to raise capital or debt. We had an ongoing conversation (with Leaf Group) for the past year and everything just kind of made sense where we got to the point where it might be better to join this wonderful company that already had two similar art-based businesses. Rather than compete against companies like Leaf Group and others, why not just join them? We were never trying to sell — it just came in front of us and everything made sense from a business perspective, an employee perspective and for the future of our artists.”

Advice to others

“A mistake is taking money too soon, bringing on funding too soon before the idea has any time to mature. We didn’t do that, and I’m very, very happy we didn’t because we were able to control 100 percent of our destiny. I have seen (founders) and I have friends who took on investors and gave up control too early on in the process. My biggest advice is be patient. Don’t try to rush into anything. Steady growth is much more healthy than uncontrollable growth that gets to the point of where it becomes difficult to make money.”

What’s next?

“We’re in the first phase of integration. What’s to come is going to be a plethora of products that will change the industry. We’ll definitely be able to make an impact on the business we’re in, which is manufacturing on demand. We are really going to catch people off-guard.”

Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver PostJon Nordmark, cofounder of eBags, and Iterate.ai is pictured at eBags headquarters on July 20, 2016 in Greenwood Village, Colorado. Jon Nordmark, eBags

Co-founded the Greenwood Village online retailer in 1998 and made it through the dot-com downturn. Left CEO role in 2008 but remained on the board. EBags was acquired in April by Samsonite, the company Nordmark previously worked at before becoming an entrepreneur. Nordmark now runs Iterate.ai, which he founded in 2013 to create a research lab for retailers that may not have the funds to invest in their own research and development.

On realizing eBags was sticking around

“The day I knew eBags would ‘make it’ was when we turned profitable. Until a company is profitable, it’s an adventure — or a venture. Until it’s profitable it needs “venture” capital or work-without-pay to bring a dream to life. After becoming profitable, a venture becomes a business. That happened to eBags in August 2001, just before the terrorist attacks. The terrorist attacks set us back, though. It took another six months to become profitable month to month.”

On taking venture capital

“Becoming a profitable business is one thing while delivering on investor needs is another. A venture-backed company needs an exit to ‘make it’ in the eyes of investors. And that never happens until it happens. Many close calls, but a close call isn’t good enough. Thankfully, Samsonite valued eBags enough to buy it for more than $100 million in May 2017.”

On starting a company

“To start eBags at 34, I spent my life savings (about $200,000), cashed out my Samsonite 401(k), took out a second mortgage of $60,000 on my house, and built up $60,000 of credit card debt. I used checks from one credit card to pay down another until Visa shut down my cards. I came within two months of not being able to make my house payment. After going without a salary for my first year, building debt and spending all my savings, I worked for the next seven years for roughly half the salary of the job I left to start eBags. I don’t think I had a vacation for the first five years and I worked almost daily. It was no cakewalk and my co-founders and I always carried the burden of owing investors a return. But thankfully, I loved the creation process. As an entrepreneur, you have to ‘do what you love’ and surround yourself with positive and hardworking people or the road can get unbearable.”

On starting another company, Iterate.ai

“My days, now, are filled with work on emerging technologies like mid-air Haptics, AR and VR, lots of artificial intelligence and deep learning-based applications, advanced Chatbots, and even website optimization techniques based on machine learning. Many of the entrepreneurs I work with are PhDs and even doctoral fellows from places like Carnegie Mellon. Almost all the technologies are built by startups which we work closely with as we bring these inventions to life inside large companies. With Iterate, I get to work with remarkable visionaries at large companies, too.”

Categories: All Denver News.

You can order a flight of chicken nuggets at the world’s first nugget tasting room

September 23, 2017 - 10:43pm

By Tim Carman, The Washington Post

The story sounds like the plot of a B-grade comedy: A chef who worked for a decade at Chez Panisse, the pioneering California restaurant that reminded Americans that ingredients actually have a season, decides to launch what she and her partner call the world’s first chicken nugget tasting room.

Yet, it’s true: Last month in Sebastopol, California, former Panisse sous chef Jennifer Johnson and wife/business partner Serafina Palandech opened the Kitchen, a lunch counter and tasting room devoted to chicken nuggets, the staple of kid’s menus everywhere. The same mystery meat that has inspired more speculation than the Kennedy assassination. The processed snack that some crave so fiercely they’ll call 911 when their orders don’t arrive fast enough. The junk food so maligned it inspired a movie in which chicken nuggets turn elementary school kids into zombies.

Johnson and Palandech are fully aware of the nugget’s less-than-savory reputation, which is a large part of the reason they got into the business. The couple’s Hip Chick Farms is “taking something that’s not considered healthy and making it beautiful,” Palandech said during a phone interview.

Their nugget mission actually began more than four years ago when the couple entered the frozen-food market with a line of chicken fingers, meatballs and other products. Hip Chick’s “farm to freezer” products are now available in more than 5,000 stores coast to coast.

You might remember that a few years ago, McDonald’s went on the offensive to dispel rumors that the chain’s McNuggets were made of chicken beaks, viscera, pink slime and roadkill. (Well, perhaps I exaggerate in the ingredient list?) The resulting video from 2014 only raised the ire of some critics, who complained that Mickey D’s glossed over the thorny issue of industrial farming practices, including growth-promoting antibiotics. (You know, the drugs that may be contributing to antibiotic resistance in humans.)

The Bay Area is now home to the world’s first chicken nugget tasting room.https://t.co/Xgpl5OIQP2

— LIVE 105 (@LIVE105) August 14, 2017

Hip Chick Farms wants to be fully transparent with the ingredients of its nuggets and fingers. According to the company’s website, the “chicken and turkey in all of our products is humanely certified, free range, natural and organic poultry that are raised without antibiotics or added hormones. The organic product is non-GMO. All of the chickens and turkey are fed a high quality, vegetable diet and grow naturally with plenty of room.”

This is “organic for the 99 percent,” said Palandech, an event planner and fundraiser before co-founding Hip Chick Farms. “Chicken sandwiches for the 99 percent.”

The inspiration for Hip Chick’s nugget-based business grew from Johnson’s 16-year stint as a personal chef for Ann and Gordon Getty, the billionaire couple and philanthropists who established a Montessori school in their home for a grandchild. Johnson made her own chicken nuggets for the kids attending the school, applying the locavore and organic lessons that she learned while working under Alice Waters at Chez Panisse. The nuggets were a hit.

One of the keys to Hip Chick’s success in the frozen-food market is that Johnson has created nuggets/fingers that don’t require dipping sauces. Instead, Johnson mixes dry ingredients right into the breading, Palandech said, injecting her snacks with the flavors of ketchup or maple syrup. There’s no need to reach for a jar of barbecue sauce to enjoy these nuggets.

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At the couple’s modest 50-seat restaurant in Sebastopol, the bites are offered with house-made sauces, just in case you suffer from that rare form of Alien Hand Syndrome, in which your arm unconsciously searches for some place, any place, to dunk a chicken nugget. At the Kitchen, you can order nuggets in three flavors: maple, ketchup and original (seasoned with salt, pepper and paprika, among other ingredients).

But the Kitchen also serves – you knew this was coming, right? – a flight of all three chicken nuggets. “Of course we do,” Palandech said, laughing.

If this sounds like Johnson and Palandech have a sense of humor about their nuggets, they do. Yes, they’re dead serious about producing high-quality chicken nuggets that don’t require a forensic scientist to reveal the ingredient list.

“But simultaneously, it’s a chicken nugget,” Palandech said. “How serious can you be?”

Categories: All Denver News.